Quarterly and Annual ReportS

 

 

 

GLOBAL INITIATIVE ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE (GISA)

17, AYODELE FANOIKI STREET. MAGODO GRA I, ISHERI, IKEJA, LAGOS STATE.

 

   

 

 

2023 ANNUAL REPORT

Introduction

The year 2023 started on a busy note as GISA staff commenced the data entering, cleaning and analysis on the Katsina state survey on substance use among women in the state. Preparations were also on for two trainings which were held within the first quarter of the year. These were:

1.      Training on Evidence-Based Substance Use Prevention, Management and Policy in the Workplace. 8th-10th February 2023.

2.      Training of Managers and Supervisors on Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) Family- Based Specialty Track. March 2023.

Virtual Training on Workplace Substance Use Prevention, Management and Policy, February 8th to 10th 2023

Participants in the workplace substance use prevention, management and policy training were seven. The training started with an opening ceremony where the Founder/Executive Director GISA, Dr. Martin O. Agwogie charged the participants to be committed to the training and learning. He encouraged them to participate in the various group exercises and share their experiences. At the end of the training, certificates of participation were presented to the participants. The training was facilitated by Dr. Martin O. Agwogie and Dr. Adetolu I. Olatunde.

Virtual Training of Managers and Supervisors on UPC Family-Based Specialty Track, March 2023

After the February workplace track training, preparation continued for the second round of training for managers and supervisors on UPC family-based specialty track. Participants at the training were eight and was conducted in five days. The training started with an opening ceremony, followed by introduction of each participant, and breaking down of each module. Dr. Martin O. Agwogie facilitated the training..

Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) Core Course

UPC Core virtual training was organised in the second quarter of the year. The training was held on the 8th, 9th, 10th 16th and 17th June, 2023 with 18 participants. As usual the training started with words of encouragement from Dr. Martin O. Agwogie and the training ended with virtual presentation of certificate to the participants. The training was facilitated by Dr. Martin O. Agwogie, Dr. Adetolu I. Olatunde, Mr. Muhammed Bashir Ibrahim and Mrs. Helen Nneka Nwafor.

Post training evaluation, knowledge, skills and experiences of participants after the trainings

Like in previous trainings, there were pe-test, post-test and post training evaluation in each of the trainings. Participants also shared knowledge gained, skills and experience for the training. The pre-test, post-test, post training and learning experiences were not significant different from that of the previous years for each of the courses. Softcopies of training materials were shared with the participants.

Workshop on Occupational Health and Safety Issues related to Substance Abuse

Within the second quarter of the year and under the invitation of the National Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA) Ogun State Command, GISA facilitated one day workshop for stakeholders and law enforcement personnel from different agencies in Ogun state. GISA was represented by the Project Manager, Dr. Adetolu I. Olatunde who facilitated the workshop. The workshop provided GISA the opportunity to share experience on substance use prevention, management and policy in the workplace. Participants (over 90) were excited with the expertise of the facilitator. 

Survey on substance use among women in Katsina state

Data entry on substance use among women in Katsina state was concluded, analysed and report presented to the Chairman/Chief Executive Officer of the National Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA), Brig. Gen. Mohamed Buba Marwa (Retd), CON who was highly impressed with the quality of work done and particularly for the initiative to identify core risk and protective factors for substance use among women in Katsina state. This he noted was a significant milestone in drug control efforts in Nigeria. He commended the collaboration between NDLEA, GISA and the Katsina state government in achieving this result which will in no small measures contribute to effective policies and interventions for positive outcomes in the drug control efforts not only in Katsina state but the whole of the country. He looked forward to replicating key components of the survey in the proposed national drug use survey.

SPEAKING EVENTS

 2023 International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking

As part of activities to commemorate the 2023 World Drug Day, the Founder/Executive Director of GISA, Dr. Martin O. Agwogie was the keynote speaker at two symposia in Ogun State and Bayelsa State where he presented papers on “Stigma and discrimination against people who use drugs/substances in Nigeria: causes, implications and way forward”. The presentation harped on the need to strengthen prevention interventions. Dr. Agwogie concluded that everyone has a role to play in eliminating stigma against people who use drugs. “By joining hands to support individuals with substance use disorders, we can minimize the consequences of substance use and improve our society…above all, there’s a need to invest in substance use prevention through collaboration, capacity building, and involving families and communities in prevention efforts with the support of government, organizations, and other stakeholders.”

International Consortium of Universities for Drug Demand Reduction     (ICUDDR) Thailand Conference

Dr. Martin O. Agwogie was in Chiang Mai, Thailand in August 2023 under the invitation of ICUDDR to speak on harm reduction in university-based addiction studies in Africa. He spoke on the development of addiction studies in Africa and the scope of the teaching of harm reduction in universities offering addiction courses in Africa. The presentation was followed by panel discussions with other speakers.

African Union 2023 High level Consultative Meeting on Drug Demand Reduction in Lusaka, Zambia

The last international speaking event for the year, 2023 was in Lusaka, Zambia at the High-level consultative meeting on Drug Demand Reduction held between 5th and 12th of November 2023. This was under the invitation of the Africa Union Commission to share experience on GISA PLAT School Project: A Model of School-Based Substance Use Prevention Intervention in Nigeria. This prevention initiative was developed as part of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Drug Abuse Prevention Centre (DAPC) grant executed in 16 secondary schools in Lagos state, Nigeria.

AYICRYP 9th National Youth Summit on Drug and Substance Abuse Prevention

The last speaking event attended by Dr. Martin O. Agwogie for the year, on behalf of GISA, was the African Youths Initiative on Crime Prevention (AYICRIP) 9th National Youth Summit on Drug and Substance Abuse Prevention held in Abuja on the 28th and 29th of November 2023. The theme for the summit was “Building Support Systems: A Prevention Approach to Drug and Substance

 Abuse and Recovery among young people”. The focus of his presentation was on developing a culture of substance use prevention where everyone has a stake in delivering evidence-based prevention interventions.

GISA represented VNGOC at the ATI consultative meeting

Considering her expertise in drug demand reduction, GISA was nominated to represented Vienna Non-Governmental Committee on Drugs (VNGOC) at the Vienna informal consultative meeting to develop the Principles on Alternative to Incarceration (ATI) for persons who use drugs in contact with the criminal justice systems. The meeting was held between 2nd and 4th of October 2023 in Vienna, Austria with global experts on Alternatives to Incarceration, including Dr. Martin O. Agwogie in Attendance.

OTHER EVENTS/ ACTIVITIES

2023 ISSUP Nigeria Chapter National Conference/ Annual General Meeting

GISA team attended the 5th National Conference/Annual General Meeting of the International Society of Substance Use Prevention and Treatment Professionals (ISSUP) Nigeria Chapter which was held on the 24th of October, 2023 at Reiz Continental Hotel Abuja, Nigeria. These were Dr. Martin O. Agwogie, Founder/Executive Director; Mrs. Faith M. Agwogie, Director of Admin & Finance and Mrs. Helen Nneka Nwafor, Admin Officer. This was part of professional development, networking and as a line of duty of the Founder/Executive Director who is also the National President of ISSUP Nigeria Chapter.

Dr. Martin O. Agwogie attended ISSUP Board Meeting in London

As a member of the Board of Directors of ISSUP Global, Dr. Martin O. Agwogie attended the ISSUP Board meeting in London. The meeting was held between 26th and 29th of September 2023.

Stakeholders Meeting on National Survey on Substance Use in Nigeria

Following the groundbreaking experience in conducting broad-based substance use prevention, risk and protective factors survey, GISA was invited by the NDLEA to make inputs into the proposed 2nd National Drug Use Survey. The virtual meeting was held on the 15th of August 2023. At the meeting were selected stakeholders on drug use survey and drug control. The meeting was coordinated by the NDLEA. The meeting continued with consultations on the survey.

Journal publications

Within the year GISA prevention work on the pilot survey on substance use among women in Katsina state was published in Drug And Alcohol Dependence, one of the high profile international journals. Also, a chapter in a book on Reforming Drug Policy in Nigeria: Research and Practical Perspectives was formally published and launched. Within the year manuscripts were also submitted and looking forward to their publication in 2024.

Conclusion

We look forward to the year 2024 with more journal publications and opportunities to put into practice our substance use prevention initiatives which have begun to get the bye in of stakeholders within and outside the country. We also look forward to sharing our experiences at local and international conferences. We appreciate all our local and international partners for believing in us.

 

 

 

 

 

GLOBAL INITIATIVE ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE (GISA)

17, AYODELE FANOIKI STREET. MAGODO GRA I, ISHERI, IKEJA, LAGOS STATE.

 

 

  

 

 

2022 ANNUAL REPORT

Introduction

The year 2022 started with great optimism having concluded the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Drug Abuse Prevention Centre (DAPC) grant project in selected secondary schools in Lagos state and looking forward to upscaling the project in the state as well as opportunities to replicate the project in other states in Nigeria. GISA was also looking forward to conducting a pilot survey on substance use among women in Katsina state, a co- sponsored project by GISA, the National Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA) and the Katsina state government. In addition, GISA looked forward to sharing its projects experience through Journal publications and conference presentations.

Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) Trainings

Four Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) trainings were conducted within the year. These include:

  1. UPC Community Track virtual training, February 2022
  2. UPC Family Track virtual training, June 2022
  3. UPC Core virtual training, July
  4. Workplace Substance Use Prevention, Management and Policy virtual training, 8th – 10th September

UPC Community Track Virtual Trainings

The UPC Community track training was conducted in February 2022 with 13 participants drawn from different parts of the country and organisations. As usual, the training started with a brief opening ceremony where the Founder/Executive Director GISA, Dr. Martin Agwogie charged the participants to be committed to the training and learning considering that the community track is one of the new learnings in UPC curricula. He encouraged participants to be involved and share experience considering that everyone is from a community. The training was facilitated by Dr. Martin Agwogie and Dr. Isacc Olatunde.

Post Training Evaluation

Post training evaluation was conducted to ascertain the knowledge gained by the participants from the training and assessment of course content.

S/N Items Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly Disagree
1.

The training objectives are clearly stated and

measurable

10 (76.92) 3 (23.08)      
2.

The course content is consistent with the

training objectives and outcomes

10 (76.92) 3 (23.08)
3.

The course   content   provides   up   to   date

information

9 (69.23) 4 (30.77)
4. The course content is relevant to my work 10 (76.92) 3 (23.08)
5.

The number of modules is sufficient to achieve

the objectives of the goal

7 (53.85) 6 (46.15)
6.

The sequence of the module is organized and

easy to follow

7 (53.85) 6 (46.15)
7.

The training   methodology   used   promote

maximum learning experience

5 (85.46) 7 (53.85) 1 (7.69)
8.

The training activities reinforce the learning of

important concept

5 (38.46) 7 (53.85) 1 (7.69)
9.

Training approach is well-balanced in terms of

contents, activities and interaction

5 (38.46) 5 (38.46) 3 (23. 08)
10.

The time allotted is sufficient to cover the

topics and exercises in the module

5 (38.46) 5 (38.46) 2 (15.38) 1 (7.69)
11.

Sufficient time is allotted to accommodate

trainees’ inquiries

5 (38.46) 8 (61.54)
12. Training materials are adequate and useful 4 (30.77) 9 (69.23)
13.

The illustration used is relevant and reinforce

important concept

8 (61.54) 5 (38.46)
14. The graphics are culturally appropriate 7 (53.85) 5 (38.46) 1 (7.69)
15.

The training has stimulated and provided me

with new insights and knowledge about substance use prevention

12 (92.31) 1 (7.69)
16.

I feel better equipped to provide evidence-

based substance use prevention in the family

9 (69.23) 4 (30.77)
17.

I believe this training will be useful in my work

environment

11 (84.62) 2 (15. 38)
18.

This training has stimulated me to inform

others about what I have learnt in these past days

8 (61. 53) 4 (30.77)
19.

I have learnt new things that I feel I will be able

to pass onto others

9 (69.23) 4 (30.77)
20.

I feel more capable of discussing substance use

prevention in the family with people in my organization, stakeholders and policy makers

10 (76.92) 3 (23.08)      

 

  1. Please grade accordingly:

 

S/N Terms Excellent Very Good Good Fair Poor
21a. Communication/information prior to the training 10 (76.92) 1 (7.69) 2 (15.38)    
21b. Group selection (participants) 5 (38.46) 7 (53.85) 1 (7.69)    
21c. Cost for the training (comparatively) 5 (38.46) 5 (38.46) 3 (23.08)    
21d. Technical inputs 6 (46.15) 5 (38.46) 2 (15.38)    

Overall training experience

Participants used the following words to describe their overall experience from the training: wonderful and impactful, amazing, very good, inspiring, excellent, fantastic and educating. One said, “it opens my inner mind” and others said, “it has affected my entire perception about substance use and prevention strategies” and “I have learnt a lot and well equipped to deliver evidence-based community interventions in my village”.

Knowledge, skills and experience from the training

How to select team members for community prevention interventions and evaluation of outcomes, proper planning in community interventions, sustainability strategies and its importance, knowing that there are many subgroups in a community, the need for a comprehensive interventions and policies in communities, process and outcome evaluation, the importance of collaboration with other stakeholder for the successful implementation of substance use prevention in the community, needs and resource assessment. As one of the participants noted, “this training has broadened my knowledge in the area of entering communities and carrying out interventions”. And another wrote, “the knowledge and skills gathered about community track will help to reinforce that of family, school and workplace”.

What participants like most about the training

What participants liked most includes the illustrations, coordination of the trainers, the active participation of group members; combined medium of training- WhatsApp and Zoom, the importance of team building, the issue of sustainability which is a major challenge in Nigeria, the sequence of the modules, the course contents, opportunity to share experience and network,

environment as a key consideration in community interventions and learning about the PROSPER evidence-based model.

What participants like least about the training

Conducting training on Saturdays, insufficient time, rigorous project evaluation and monitoring process, online training and network issues. One of the participants noted, “I would have preferred in person training”.

Things to change based on experience from the training

The following were mentioned as things to change, working without planning, playdown on assumptions in prevention, thinking ahead of how project will be sustained even before starting, thoroughness and evidence-based outcome, engaging more stakeholders before program implementation, carrying out needs and resource assessments before interventions. Some participants put it this way: “I will provide more of community interventions in my community”, “I will change my ways of planning for project implementation”, “ensure that communities have the capacity for quality prevention interventions”.

What will make change and utilizing experience difficult

Funding issues, less informed people to complement efforts, the long process of evaluation and monitoring and conservative approach to substance use prevention in communities were the challenges mentioned.

Missing information, if any

Cost analysis and practical sessions were identified as important components that are missing in the training.

Comment, suggestion or remarks

The following were the general comments and suggestions which were more of appreciation to GISA and the facilitators. For example, “thank you GISA for the impact you are making in our society”, “good event and hope to prepare for credentialling with these training”, “it is only God that can be perfect but to this training GISA initiative boards you are doing well and pray for more knowledge”, “well done Dr. Martin; well done GISA”. One of the participants requested for in- person training.

UPC Family Track Training

The UPC family specialty track training was conducted on the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 10th and 11th of June 2022 with 15 participants. The training started with an opening ceremony where the

Founder/Executive Director GISA, Dr. Martin Agwogie encouraged participants to be involved in the various group exercises and share their experiences. The training was facilitated by Dr. Martin Agwogie.

Post Training Evaluation

In the training, there was a post training evaluation to assess participants’ knowledge on the training received.

S/N Items Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly Disagree
1. The training objectives are clearly stated and measurable 10(71.43) 4(28.57)
2. The course content is consistent with the training objectives and outcomes 10(71.43) 4(28.57)
3. The course content provides up to date information 10(71.43) 4(28.57)
4. The course content is relevant to my work 8(57.14) 6(42.86)
5. The number of modules is sufficient to achieve the objectives of the goal 5(35.71) 7(50) 2(12.29)
6. The sequence of the module is organized and easy to follow 8(57.14) 6(42.86)
7. The training methodology used promote maximum learning experience 5(35.71) 6(42.86) 3(21.43)
8. The training activities reinforce the learning of important concept 7(50) 7(50)
9. Training approach is well-balanced in terms of contents, activities and interaction 5(35.71) 6(42.86) 3(21.43)
10. The time allotted is sufficient to cover the topics and exercises in the module 4(28.57) 7(50) 3(21.43)
11. Sufficient time is allotted to accommodate trainees’ inquiries 5(35.71) 9(64.29)
12. Training materials are adequate and useful 7(50) 7(50)
13. The illustration used is relevant and reinforce important concept 8(57.14) 6(42.86)
14. The graphics are culturally appropriate 2(14.29) 9(64.29) 3(21.43)
15.

The training has stimulated and provided

me with new insights and knowledge about substance use prevention

9(64.29) 5(35.71)
16.

I feel better equipped to provide evidence

-based substance use prevention

7(50) 7(50)
17. I believe this training will be useful in my work environment 8(57.14) 6(42.86)
18.

This training has stimulated me to inform others about what I have learnt in these

past days

9(64.29) 5(35.71)
19. I have learnt new things that I feel I will be able to pass onto others 9(64.29) 5(35.710
20. I feel more capable of discussing substance use prevention with people and organizations in this field 10(71.43) 4(28.57)
  1. Please grade accordingly:
S/N Terms Excellent Very Good Good Fair Poor
21a. Communication/Information prior to the training 5(35.71) 4(28.57) 1(7.14) 4(28.57)
21b. Group Selection (participants) 5(35.71) 7(50) 2(14.29)
21c. Cost for the training (comparatively) 4(28.57) 3(21.43) 6(42.86) 1(7.14)
21d. Technical Inputs 6(42.86) 8(57.14)

 

Knowledge, skills and experiences of participants from the training

The feedback on the knowledge, skills and experience gathered by the participants at the end of the training includes: family prevention intervention methods and the need to be resourceful as an intervention provider, that substance use prevention starts from pregnancy period for the child, monitoring and evaluation of prevention program is key to ascertaining progress, understanding of the culture of areas where substance use is prevalent, the need for fidelity in executing prevention programs, there is a difference between substance use and abuse, the different parenting interventions, youth/family skills, that empathy and positive regards are very important if one is to excel in this filed, having a good understanding of the position and perception of clients is important, how substance use affects different parts of the brain and the need to pay attention to target age groups while selecting an intervention, taking cognizance of community biases in developing intervention and knowing that one cannot do it alone but need relevant stakeholders. Things to change based on training experience

Trainees outlined things they would like to change based on the experience gathered during the training. These are: approach to family intervention programs and target groups, be more empathetical and encourage participation of participants at program to ensure success, approach to training for a more productive outcomes, change in information dissemination and attitudes about persons who use drugs, grouping all ages together for interventions and the need to be an active listener.

Difficulties Likely to face in embarking on change and use of experience

Trainees outlined some difficulties they might face in disseminating the knowledge and skills they have acquired from the training. These include the low educational background of people in communities which inhibits acceptance of evidence-based interventions in the family, lack of political will by government to whole heartedly implement substance use prevention programs, insufficient staff, lack of funds, grouping interventions across age brackets, the rigorous family prevention interventions, cultural and social biases in families, the issue of stigmatization, changing from conservative approach to evidence-based and how to engage the entire family for a more productive outcomes.

Comments and suggestions

Participants commented on the training and made some suggestions. In their words, “I will like to suggest that some of these intervention programs be conducted in my community even as a pilot project”, “let’s have more of this regularly and publication to buttress the efficiency of this program for different target groups”, “I wish to attend more of this”, “excellent presentation, looking forward to other trainings”, “I appreciate the good facilitation”.

The training ended with words of encouragement from the Founder/Executive Director of GISA to the participants to go back to their various operational domains and put into practice the knowledge and skills gained from the training. Certificates were presented to the participants who completed the five days training.

UPC Core Virtual Training

The UPC Core training was conducted on the 14th, 15th, 16th, 22nd and 23rd of July 2022. The number of participants were 15 and the training was encircled by different professionals and students of higher institutions. The duration for the training was six days. As usual, the training started with an opening ceremony and was facilitated by Dr. Martin Agwogie, Dr. Isaac Olatunde and Mr. Olatunji Erinjogunola.

Like the previous UPC Core trainings, evaluation was carried out at the end of the training with comments on different aspects of the training by the participants. The comments are not significantly different from feedbacks form previous UPC Core trainings.

Virtual Training on Workplace Substance Use Prevention, Management and Policy

The workplace substance use prevention, management and policy training was conducted between 8th and 10th of September, 2022 with 12 participants and was facilitated by Dr. Martin Agwogie. Post Training Evaluation

After the training, post training evaluation was conducted to assess participants knowledge from the training.

S/N Items

Strongly

Agree

Agree Neutral Disagree

Strongly

Disagree

1.

The training objectives are clearly stated and

measurable

10(83.3) 2(16.7)      
2.

The course content is consistent with the

training objectives and outcomes

11(91.7) 1(8.3)      
3.

The course   content   provides   up   to   date

information

8(66.7) 4(33.3)      
4. The course content is relevant to my work 8(66.7) 3(25) 1(8.3)
5. The number of modules is sufficient to achieve the objectives of the goal 7(58.3) 4(33.3) 1(8.3)
6. The sequence of the module is organized and easy to follow 10(83.3) 2(16.7)
7. The     training    methodology    used    promote maximum learning experience 6(50) 6(50)
8. The training activities reinforce the learning of important concept 9(75) 3(25)
9. Training approach is well-balanced in terms of contents, activities and interaction 7(58.3) 5(41.7)
10. The time allotted is sufficient to cover the topics and exercises in the module 4(33.3) 5(41.7) 3(25)
11. Sufficient time is allotted to accommodate trainees’ inquiries 10(83.3) 2(16.7)
12. Training materials are adequate and useful 7(58.3) 5(41.7)
13. The illustration used is relevant and reinforce important concept 9(75) 3(25)
14. The graphics are culturally appropriate 6(50) 5(41.7) 1(8.3)
15.

The training has stimulated and provided me with new insights and knowledge about

substance use prevention

11(91.7) 1(8,3)
16. I feel better equipped to provide evidence -based substance use prevention 9(75) 3(25)
17. I believe this training will be useful in my work environment 10(83.3) 1(8.3) 1(8.3)
18. This training has stimulated me to inform others about what I have learnt in these past days 11(91.7) 1(8.3)
19. I have learnt new things that I feel I will be able to pass onto others 11(91.7) 1(8.3)
20. I feel more capable of discussing substance use prevention with people and organizations in this field 9(75) 3(25)

 

  1. Please grade accordingly:

 

S/N Terms Excellent Very Good Good Fair Poor
21a. Communication/Information prior to the training 9(75) 3(25)
21b. Group Selection (participants) 6(50) 5(41.7) 1(8.3)
21c. Cost for the training (comparatively) 7(58.3) 4(33.3) 1(8.3)
21d. Technical Inputs 4(33.3) 6(50) 2(16.7)

Knowledge, skills or experience from the training

Better knowledge and skills for consultancy services, knowledge of drugs statistics and the business case for pushing it forward to an organization, how to develop a policy at the workplace, the importance of policy in workplace particularly for substance use prevention intervention, knowing that addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disease and that empathy is required for persons who use drugs, learnt about the elevator’s speech, post treatment drug testing as part of workplace intervention, harm reduction policy and that adaptation is “manipulation” but not mutilation of

evidence-based intervention. Some of the participants described the training as very educative, excellent, highly recommended and satisfactory.

What participants like most

The convenience of a virtual classroom; the way Dr. Martin took his time to explain, reiterate concepts and allow for active participation; the simplicity with which the program was organized as well as the time consciousness. One of the participants stated, “the willingness of GISA to hold our hands as we grow in the industry and the business case in workplace prevention are very encouraging”.

What participants like least about the training

The disruption of network connectivity, limited time to cover so much, more discussion on the policy documents and the fact that the training was virtual were identified.

What participants would like to change based on experience

The following were the response of participants on what they would like to change based on experience from the study: “my approach to writing proposals”, “my view of workplace settings in relation to substance use”, “my perception about persons who use drugs”, “my attitude and desires for more training has changed”. Others include the need to work with data and stop thinking of abstinence alone, making drug policy a priority in the workplace.

Things that will make change and using experience from the training difficult

Office bureaucracy, making organizations understand the need to develop drug policies for the different workplaces, balancing enforcement and drug demand reduction and how to influence organization culture and climate.

What information is missing, If any.

Issues relating to advocacy, no opportunity for practical role play and code of ethics of the professionals were identified as missing.

Comment, suggestions and remarks

The following were the comments and suggestions. There is the need to create a network amongst participants and connect them to international opportunities, more information and materials to track evidence-based research in these areas were suggested. Others put it this way: “I am very grateful” and “the experience was amazing”.

Other trainings

GISA was engaged by NDLEA to deliver training for the law enforcement personnel in Lagos state. The training was facilitated by the Project Manager and Trainer, Dr. Isaac Olatunde. The theme of the workshop was: “Occupation Health and Safety Issues with Substance Use among Law Enforcement Personnel”. Participants comprises of officers from The Nigerian Army, Nigeria Customs Service, Nigeria Immigration Service, NDLEA, Nigeria Police Force, Department of State Services, Nigeria Road Safety Corps and Nigeria Quarantine Agency.

 GISA-UNODC Project Report Presentation

GISA presented the report of the GSIA-UNODC project which was carried out in 2020 and 2021. Present at the report presentation session were the Honorable Commissioner for Education Lagos State, Mrs. Folasade Adefisayo; the Director CGSC&SE Unit Ministry of Education, Mrs. Olusola Somoye; staff of the Ministries of Education, Health, Youth and Social Development Lagos state. Others were the Education District Counsellors from the six Districts, Principals and the Substance Abuse Prevention Officers (SAPOs) coordinators in each of the participated schools in the project.

 GISA-NDLEA and Katsina State Drug Use Survey

The pilot survey on substance use among women in Katsina state was conducted through collaboration between GISA, NDLEA and the Katsina state government. The survey was cconceived by His Excellency, Rt. Hon. Aminu Bello Masari, CFR, the Executive Governor of Katsina State following concerns over the rising cases of substance use among women in the state. Objectives include to examine the extent or prevalence of drug/substance use among women in Katsina state, identify common risk and protective factors associated with substance use in the state, identify symptoms of substance use disorders among users and make recommendations for interventions. The survey was conducted between January and June 2022. A copy of the report was presented to the Governor in August 2022 by the NDLEA Katsina state commander, Mr. Bashir Mohammed Ibrahim after a virtual presentation of the report by Dr. Martin Agwogie.

The survey highlighted the risk and protective factors for substance use among women in Katsina state among other findings part of which have been developed and submitted for journal publication. Impressed by the outcome of the pilot survey, the Governor approved a more comprehensive statewide survey on substance use among women in the state to be conducted by GISA.

Conferences

Four GISA staff and trainers attended the 7th Annual Conference of the International Society of Substance Use Prevention and Treatment Professionals (ISSUP) held in Abu Dhabi between 12th and 16th of May 2022 with the theme “Uniting Global Community to Face the Challenges of Addiction”. The staff were the Founder/ Executive Director, Dr. Martin Agwogie; the Project Manager Dr. Isaac Olatunde; the Youth Leader/ Trainer, Mr. Olatunji Erinjogunola and a National Trainer, Mr. Olugbenga Mabo. While Dr. Agwogie attended meetings, moderated sessions and shared experience of GISA’s prevention interventions in Nigeria, Dr. Olatunde received training as Drug Demand Reduction Global Trainer by the UNODC. Mr. Erinjogunola and Mabo received UPC Family-based prevention specialty track and URC ALLIES respectively. Dr. Olatunde, Mr. Erinjogunola and Mr. Mabo sat for the UPC certification examinations as one of the first set of UPC practitioners to take the certification exams.

Other activities

In recognition of the activities of GISA and expertise of the Founder, Dr. Martin Agwogie was invited as the guest speaker at the grand finale of the commemoration of the International Day

Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking where he spoke on the topic: “Addressing Drug Challenges in Health and Humanitarian Crises: Settings in Need of Care for A Comprehensive Drug Use Prevention in Nigeria”.

The last quarter of the year 2022 started with preparation for the 4th Annual Conference/General Meeting of the International Society of Substance Use Prevention and Treatment Professionals (ISSUP) which was held on the 25th of October 2022 at Chelsea Hotel Abuja, Nigeria with Dr. Martin Agwogie coordinating as the President of the Association. Similarly, Dr. Martin Agwogie was in Vienna Austria to represent Vienna Non-Governmental Organisation Committee on Drugs (VNGOC) at the final review of the UNODC Guiding Document on the Role of Law Enforcement Officers in Drug Use Prevention within the School Settings. Within the same quarter, Dr. Agwogie was also in Lisbon, Portugal at the Lisbon Addictions 2022 Conference to share some of the experiences of GISA.

United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)

One of the achievements of GISA and recognition of its activities was the granting of special consultative status by the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) in 2022. This was received with excitement and a challenge to do more in promoting and delivering evidence- based interventions.

Journal Publications

Part of GISA’s time in 2022 was devoted to journal publications. Some of the articles published or already approved for publication includes:

Johnson, K., Pinchuk, I., Melgar, M. I. E, Agwogie, M. O., & Silva, F. S. (2022). The global movement towards a public health approach to substance use disorders, Annals of Medicine, 54:1, 1797-1808, DOI: 10.1080/07853890.2022.2079150

This publication captures the contribution of GISA and other stakeholders towards the development of public health approach to drug control in Nigeria.

 

Agwogie, M. O., Kliewer, W., Mattfeld, M., Somoye, O. A., Olatunde, I. A. & Ola, B. A. (2022). Parenting and School Context Differentiate Nigerian Adolescents’ Profiles of Substance Use. International Perspectives in Psychology: Research, Practice, Consultation. https://doi.org/10.1027/2157-3891/a000060

This is one of the publications from the UNODC-DAPC grant data. More manuscripts have been developed for publication in 2023.

 

Agwogie, M. O. Development and Piloting of Workplace Substance Use Prevention, Management and Policy Training Manual in Nigeria. African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies. In print.

 

Book Chapters

In addition to the journal publications, the work of GISA was contributed to the following three books in 2022. While one was published, two were in print as at the end of the year.

 

Agwogie, M. O. (2022). Prevention and Control of Substance Abuse. In A. Okafor (ed), A Textbook of Public Health Pharmacy. University of Lagos Press and Bookshop Ltd, Lagos, Nigeria.

 

Agwogie, M. O. Substance Use Prevention Interventions in Nigeria: Progress, Gaps and The Way Forward In I. S. Obot (ed), Reforming Drug Policy in Nigeria: Research and Practice Perspectives. Centre for Research and Information on Substance Abuse, Uyo, Nigeria. In Print

 

Agwogie, M. O. Implementing and evaluating the Universal Prevention Curriculum to promote capacity building among drug demand reduction practitioners in Nigeria: Lessons learned and future directions. African Union Compendium on Drugs. In print

 

Conference presentations

The conference presentations include:

Addiction Curriculum in Nigerian Higher Education System – Contextualizing Western-based methods and approaches responsiveness and effectiveness. Invited symposium presentation at Lisbon Addictions 2022 Conference. Lisbon, Portugal (November).

 

Implementing and evaluating the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) to promote capacity building among drug demand reduction practitioners in Nigeria: Lessons learned and future directions. Invited symposium presentation at African Union Session, ISSUP Abu Dhabi 2022 Conference. Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (May).

 

Development and Piloting of Workplace Substance Use Prevention, Management and Policy Training Manual in Nigeria CRISA conference, Abuja, Nigeria. June 27, 2022.

 

Conclusion

From this report, it is obvious that participants in the different trainings organized by GISA in 2022 were highly impressed with the training and asked for more. They also identified major factors hindering translation of knowledge to practice. These are major issues that need to be addressed. We hope to collaborate with the relevant stakeholders in the coming year to address these challenges for a more effective substance use prevention interventions in Nigeria.

Generally, the year 2022 ended with a sense of fulfilment while preparing for the grant execution of the Katsina state survey on substance use among women as approved by the state government. The year 2023 is already looking busy considering the scope of the survey among other activities. We also look forward to more journal publications in 2023 to share experience of the work of GISA in promoting evidence-based interventions. We are grateful to all our partners for their support in the year 2022.

           

   GLOBAL INITIATIVE ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE (GISA)

17, AYODELE FANOIKI STREET. MAGODO GRA I, ISHERI, IKEJA, LAGOS STATE.

2021 ANNUAL REPORT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction

The year, 2021 started with high hopes as it marked the commencement of major activities of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Drug Abuse Prevention Centre (DAPC) grant project in selected secondary schools in Lagos state, Nigeria. Also, the engagement of Global Initiative on Substance Abuse (GISA) by the Economic Community Of West African States (ECOWAS) to deliver the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) training in Ghana. These were in addition to other UPC training courses planned for the different specialty tracks.

Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) Trainings

Five UPC courses were delivered in 2021. These include:
1. Virtual UPC Core trainings, 15th – 30th of January, 5th – 20th of March and 5th
– 10th of July,2021.
2. Virtual Training on Drug Abuse Prevention Management and Policy in the Workplace 2nd–4th February 2021.
3. Training of Prevention Experts on Evidence-Based Substance Use Prevention in the Family. 16th– 20th August 2021.

Virtual UPC Core Trainings

Three UPC Core trainings were delivered in 2021, 15th– 30th of January, 5th– 20th of March and 5th– 10th of July, with a total of 43 participants. The trainings were conducted virtually and facilitated by GISA staff led by the Founder/ Executive Director, Dr. Martin Agwogie. Each of the trainings started with an opening ceremony where Dr. Agwogie urged participants to be committed to the training. In each case, he promised that the training was going to be lively and more interactive as all the participants will be carried along. Dr. Agwogie heartens them to always participate in the group exercises by bringing in their individual points and sharing their experiences during the training. Participants were from different government parastatals, non governmental organisations and from different professions in Nigeria.
Each of the training was assessed using pre and post-tests. Participants were also given the opportunity to comment on different aspects of the training as feedback. Major aspects of the assessments are provided in Table 1.

 Knowledge, skills and experience of participants from the training

Like in previous GISA’s trainings, participants were asked to provide feedback on the Knowledge, skills and experiences garnered at the end of the training. Participants also commended GISA and the facilitators for the dept of knowledge and facilitation while some participants requested more of similar trainings. Some of the specific feedback are: gained knowledge on the role of genetics in substance use disorders, how to implement evidence-based interventions and its importance, gained more project design skills, know about resolute non-users and vulnerable non users, how to apply evidence-based principles as prevention professionals, have updated knowledge on the ethical code of the profession, how to conduct risk and community assessment, the need for empathy when dealing with persons who use substances, learnt that prevention is science and not by gut feelings, learnt that evidence-based prevention enables better evaluation than traditional methods, that everyone has a role to play in assisting persons who use drugs in the community, pharmacology of the brain as regards substance abuse, the need for collaboration among prevention professionals. Also gained knowledge on the difference between universal, selective and indicated populations, acquired advocacy skills; handling ethical dilemma in prevention program; community engagement skills; knowing the importance of evaluation to determine the areas of strengths and weaknesses and plan for improvement; that total ban of a substance may not necessarily translate to prevention its use and knowing that success in prevention does not mean only when one achieve 100%, every little effort counts.

Things to change based on training experience

Participants also listed things they would like to change following knowledge from the trainings.
These include drug abuse campaign strategies, the use of persons in recovery in substance use 5 prevention as testimonials, the wrong perceptions about persons who use drugs and stigmatization, creating awareness without in depth prevention programs, not to expect automatic change of behaviour in people who use substances, mode of communication about drugs with colleagues.

Things that will make change difficult and use of experience gained

Rigorous process in implementing evidence-based interventions including data collection process, conservative to change, funding, pressure from colleagues, inadequate human and material resources, lack of support from employer and/or government, lack of support from supervisors and lack of similar knowledge by colleagues.

Comments and suggestions

The following were the comments on the facilitation. Thank you, Dr. Martin and your team for the wonderful job you are doing, excellent facilitation, awesome job. One noted, “I need to do further training for the specialist track”.

Drug Abuse Prevention Management and Policy in the Workplace

A virtual training on Drug Abuse Prevention Management and Policy in the Workplace was conducted in the first quarter 2021 (2 nd – 4th February) with seven participants. A summary of the evaluation is provided in table 2.

Knowledge, skills and experience of participants from the training
Like in previous trainings, participants also provided feedback on the knowledge, skills and experiences garnered at the end of the training. These include knowledge about the business case for substance use prevention in the workplace, the limited impact of drug testing in the workplace, how to develop drug policy in the workplace with the involvement of the relevant stakeholders, knowing about the UNODC workplace policy standard, knowing about the functions of the brain with drug abuse and addiction, strategies and activities for research on prevention interventions in the workplace. Participants also stated that they learnt why workplace is an important setting for substance use prevention programme as well as workplace protective characteristics.

What participants like most

The following were documented as what participants liked most about the training: the lead facilitators approach and the use of the chat box to share ideas during the training; depth of knowledge and ability to convey ideas to participants clearly and patiently by the facilitators; the large group discussions and exercises. One of the participants put it this way, “how our instructor Dr. Martin simplified the teaching for the understanding of all regardless of one’s occupational or professional background”. Others noted, “Dr. Martin is very down to earth, well informed, cordial and easy to relate with” and “the delivery methods gave me good insights into what prevention interventions in the workplace is all about”, “the training is broad and very educative and the availability of sufficient information and practical engagement of the participants”.

What participants like least about the training

The following were the comments on what participants liked least. “That it was virtual, I feel the group exercises should have been more coordinated considering the limited time for the group exercises”, “I feel the training should be about two weeks of evening classes and overnight exercises”, “few resource persons mostly Dr. Martin”, “network bandwidth issues and I wish the class was face to face instead of virtual class”, “the volume of the work, I did not realize the intensity of the course”.

Things to change based on experience from the training

Method of delivery prevention strategies in the workplace, intervention that are not evidence based, change perception about substance use among the adult population, approaching issues with great command of skills, avoid personal testimony and random drug test, planning intervention efforts and study a setting before delivering intervention.

Things that will make change or utilizing experience difficult

Workplace setting, bureaucratic procedures at workplace, having a boss who has not received the workplace prevention training may hinder the implementation of what was learnt, lack of budgetary provision for interventions in the workplace, the challenge of gathering baseline data in some work setting.

General comments or suggestions

Physical training and making modules available before training was suggested. Other suggestions were to make the training residential and dividing the training into parts of the day, like evenings as against three straight days. Some participants also expressed appreciation to GISA. Some of the participants wrote “The training is very much appreciated and of course I am super grateful for this opportunity”. “I really enjoyed this course and hope to have more of it to improve my skills”. One requested more examples around policy development in the workplace. At the end of the training, virtual presentation of certificates was made.

Training of Prevention Experts on Evidence-Based Substance Use Prevention in The Family

The training of prevention experts on evidence-based substance use prevention in the family was conducted between 16th and 20th of August 2021 with 8 participants. The in-person training was conducted at GISA facility, No. 17 Ayodele Fanoiki Street, Magodo Estate Phase 1, Isheri Lagos. Participants were practitioners who had received the UPC Core training with broad experience in substance use prevention. It was a successful training with an opportunity to experiment and gradually embrace in person training after the COVID-19 impact on GISA UPC trainings. The training was facilitated by Dr. Martin Agwogie, Dr. Isaac Olatunde and Mr. Olatunji Erinjogunola.

 Overall training experience
At the end of the family track specialty course, participants were asked to share their overall training experience and the following were the comments. Awesome and impactful; great in all areas; very insightful, motivating and stimulating; above average especially the knowledge of evidence-based prevention practice in the family; better equipped with knowledge and capacity for evidence-based prevention interventions; the training was amazing; excellent; learnt absolutely 11 new skills and information about substance use prevention. Some of the participants responded thus: “I learnt new concept, ideas, approaches and was able to connect to other colleagues too”, “the training was really informative and highly enlightening and I learnt a lot and the task were really practical and brought the theories to light”, “I have been well informed and encouraged that I’m eager to pursue further training on evidence-based interventions in the family”, “it was really a wonderful experience”.

What participants like most about the training

Participants were asked what they liked most, and the following were documented. Knowing more about human behaviour, dysfunctional home and how it relates to substance use; peer review of planned intervention with evidence-based international practices; the volume of information, breakdown of each module, skill and expertise in delivery; the insights into what prevention interventions in the family is all about; scientific manner in which the training was conducted, participants were allowed to contribute and ask questions, carrying participants along with no dull moments; the practical scenarios which made it easy to apply what were thought and the perception of parents about drug use and how drugs work on the brain.

What participants like least about the training

Nothing significant was documented as part of what the participants liked least except that participants would have expected more number of participants at the training that would have encouraged a more robust large groups session and benefitting from one another.

Major takeaways from the training

Learnt about the positive and negative influence of parents in substance use, evidence-based prevention strategies in the family and different interventions, the concept of do no harm – it is better to leave people the way they are than stimulate drug use, that prevention starts when the child is in the womb, youths should be specifically targeted with prevention and all processes should be guided by ethics in a multidisciplinary team, drug use assessment skills in the family, collaboration and evidence-based practice, importance of understanding the different groups of population before proposing any intervention and identifying household items that serves as risk for substance use.

What participants would like to change based on experience from the training

Identifying the right target audience and age bracket, change in approach and bringing ethics into drug prevention interventions, focus interventions more on the young ones, change unscientific prevention programs, trying to deliver intervention alone, the act of condemning people who use substances instead find out the reason why they use and seek ways to help them and making parents to have a good understanding that they have a major role to play in substance use prevention,

Missing information that participants feel are important if any

Specific examples of advance/further trainings for evidence-based prevention in the family, addressing substance use associated stigma in the family, up-to-date interventions to buttress and show commitments and outcomes of evidence-based interventions in the family were identified as missing in the training. However, one of the participants noted: “none that I can think of as it is absolutely holistic”.

Other comments, suggestions or remarks

These were the responses from participants. “By and large the training was fantastic and it is a must for everybody involved in substance use prevention in the family”, “I am so impressed with the training, met beyond my expectations, I’m grateful to GISA team for putting this great training up”, “I am wondering if the recording of the training will be shared to participants, it will serve as a refresher purpose”, “training was very rewarding, more time should be allocated to group assignments”, “continue leading us the way to go in substance use prevention interventions”, “further trainings and refresher ones should include modern practice and findings to sustain interventions”, “this is a training I would fully recommend to anyone who wants to get involved in substance use prevention in the family”.

GISA-UNODC DAPC Grant Project

The project on substance use prevention in selected secondary schools in Lagos state under the UNODC-DAPC grant had major effect with the training of teachers in two batches (Batch A, 1st to 4th of March and Batch B, 19th to 22nd of April 2021. Ahead of the training, GISA team led by the Founder/ Executive Director Dr. Martin Agwogie had met with the Lagos state Ministry of Education officials led by the Director and Head Child Guidance, School Counselling and Special Education (CGSC&SE) Department, Mrs. Olusola Somoye. This was followed by contacts with other relevant stakeholders

Similarly, a refresher training was conducted as well as a meeting with the Monitoring officers drawn from the Lagos state Ministries of Education, Health, Youths and Social Development

The training of teachers as Substance Abuse Prevention Officers (SAPOs) was conducted in two batches with a total of 67 participants drawn from 15 junior and senior secondary schools across the six education districts in Lagos state, 62 teachers and five staff of the Lagos state Ministries of Education, Health, Youth and Social Development. Both trainings started with opening ceremony.

Dignitaries who witnessed one or both ceremonies were the Director, CGSC&SE, Lagos State Ministry of Education, Olusola Somoye who represented the Honourable Commissioner for Education; the UNODC National Project Officer in Nigeria, Dr. Akanidomo Ibanga who represented UNODC Nigeria; the Founder/ Executive Director of GISA, Dr. Martin Agwogie; GISA Project Manager, Dr Isaac Olatunde; Mrs. Kalejaye A. E. who represented the Permanent Secretary of Lagos State Education District 11; Pharm. Moses Awolola represented the Permanent Secretary Lagos State Ministry of Health; Mrs. Owoo, M. B. represented the Permanent Secretary of Lagos State Education District 1 and Mrs. Jaiyaila O. A. represented the ministry of Youth and
Social Development. Each of the dignitaries gave the trainees an insight of what the training is all about. In his opening remarks, the Executive Director of GISA, Dr Martin Agwogie highlighted the objectives and benefits of the training and overall expectations from the project while the Lagos state Commissioner for Education encouraged the participants to put in their best in the training noting that it will benefit them, their students and families. The two batches of trainings were conducted in Unique Heights Junior and Senior High School, Magodo Estate Phase 1, Isheri Lagos.
The four days training for each batch was facilitated by UPC National Trainers, including Dr. Martin Agwogie, Dr Oluseyi Odewale, Dr. Olatunde Isaac, Mrs. Maria Illugbuhi and Mr. Olatunji Erinjogunola. The UPC school-based specialty track was the main resource material deployed for the training. The four days training was followed by another 2 days training in the respective schools. At the end of the 2 days follow-up training, certificates for the 6 days training were presented to the participants in their respective schools.

Pre and Post Training Evaluation was conducted to assess the training materials, knowledge gained by participants, content delivery, and engagement of participants in the training.

Feedback from participants

At the end of the training, the teachers used the following words/ terms to describe their training experience: excellent, adequate, an eye opener, fantastic, superb, highly educative, very impactful, wonderful, informative, splendid and inspiring.

Knowledge, skills and experience of participants from the training

Participants indicated the following as knowledge, skills and experience gained from the training:
The component of school based prevention interventions, the stages of human brain developmental, developing prevention action plan and implantation process, creating positive climate/environment for learning, exchange of ideas during interactive sessions, additional knowledge on school-based substance use prevention, that teachers play key roles in implementing school-based substance use prevention, creating a balance relationship between the teachers and the students, team building, skills to relate with students according to their personalities, the right approach in implementing substance use prevention in school settings, skills on how to build GISA Prevention Leadership Action Team (GPLAT) in the school setting, developing school prevention policy, skills for bonding and connectedness among the students and teachers, skills on how to engage students to improve their behaviour, risk and protective factors for substance use, parenting skills, the good behaviour game, how to write persuasive speech, good leadership for substance use prevention, positive school climate, importance of age grouping in information dissemination on substance use prevention, becoming an agent of change, how to prevent and guide students on substance use in the school setting, concreate learning, substance use prevention
should be evidence-based, the need to provide help to persons who use substances instead of punishment, hearing and effective listening, well understood that change is a process, substance use disorders can be genetically predisposed, more knowledgeable on substance use prevention in school setting and good application skills. Some participants put it this way, “my thinking and way of reasoning about substance use changed positively”, “how to control my emotions”, “I learnt new skills for facilitating training”, “I have learnt to take good care of my students than before”, “I learnt effective teamwork and collaboration, interpersonal and interactive skills”, “learnt about the physiological make-up of the brain and how it affects behaviour at different stages in life” and “I learnt how to create a conducive and safe classroom environment for students for substance use prevention”.

What participants like most

Participants were asked what they liked most about the training and the following were the comments: very educative and impactful, trainers were well coordinated and grounded on the topics, interactive sessions and clear communication, clear explanation on school and classroom climate and the good behaviour game, ability of the trainers to carry all participants along and interactive nature of the training, the enthusiasm of the trainers, the conducive environment for the training and the friendly attitude of the facilitators, it was all about prevention not scary messages, it was unique, the three components of school-based prevention, the practical class and group demonstration, the course materials, willingness of all the trainers to accommodate all questions from trainees, knowledge acquired, creating a GPLAT, opening up discussion that people who use drugs need help.

What participants like least

Far location of the training venue, insufficient time and long duration for the daily training, the strenuous training exercises, too many hours of sitting, short time for the modules covered and that not much was covered on students who have been using substances were the least liked aspects of the training.

Things to change based on experience from this training

The following were the comments on things to change based on experience from the training. Avoid generalization of the student’s population, sharing of life experience of persons recovering from substance use with students, change negative mindset about people who use substances, rewards for good behaviours, school policy, show more love to the students than just punishment, develop interpersonal relationship skills with the students, improve in the methods of providing helps to people who use substances, give more incentives to students with positive classroom behaviour and building a positive behavioural matrix, not using commanding tone or get angry easily on students. Some of the participants puts it this way: “I will improve my student-teacher connectedness and my approach to the indicated population”, “change the way I punish students without considering the cause of their misbehaviour”, “avoid showing students various types of substances and use of negative words on students”, “change my negative attitude towards my students and other staff orientation based on substance related issues”, “change the way I relate with students in the presence of other students and attitude to school climate and school policy”, “change from being authoritative, giving more attention to the students, correcting with love and
provide solution”, “I will pay more attention to appropriate behaviour and reward accordingly”, “I will continue to be a role model through my attitude and behaviours”, “I will improve my level of relationship with my students using positive words”. Things that will make change and use of experience from the training difficult On things that will make change or making good use of experience from the training difficult, participants identified the school management, time constraints in the school system, lack of cooperation by members of staff, limited financial resources, workload, getting committed team member of the GPLAT, the challenge in students’ environment, process of developing or changing policy. Others identified lack of support and follow up from parents, guardians and community, management acceptance of the prevention policy and approval of the other interventions as well as challenges with sustainability of interventions.

Missing information from the training that participants thought were important

The need for accommodation for the participants to reduce travelling related stress, recorded videos of substance use prevention implementation and learning on emotional intelligence were the few issues raised.

General comment

Participants were asked to make any other comments, suggestions or remarks. The following were the comments: “I want to sincerely appreciate GISA for this programme”, “GISA, please train other school teachers”, “God bless GISA, UNODC and Lagos state”, “GISA, please extend this training beyond school setting”, “the training is voluminous, more time should be allocated for it”, “please allocate more time and make provision for participants to reside close to training venue”, “well educating and satisfactory”, “there must be proper follow-up after this training”, “this project is a good initiative, keep it up GISA, don’t relent”, “thank you so much GISA for the fantastic dissemination of knowledge”, “this training has really helped me to know and understand those things I don’t know initially”, “I am so happy to be a participant, it is loaded, timely and highly educative”, “the training is very incisive and apt”, “thanks so much for impacting more knowledge in us, we really appreciate”. Additional comments were shared on the participants WhatsApp platform thus: “to the entire GISA-UNODC team, I say thank you and May Allah grant your heart desires for the wonderful job done”, “God bless you and your team, you all are indeed wonderful facilitators”, “A big thanks to all our facilitators and to all other participants from other schools looking forward to meet again for another interesting training”, “the training was quite an experience, I pray GOD will help us to put into use what we have learnt and at the long run be used as instrument of change for a better tomorrow in our homes, school, community, and the society at large. Amen”, “I really enjoyed all our presentations and interactive sessions. I pray that our input to the fight against substance abuse will yield significant results”, “on behalf of my school management and Education District 3, I am saying thank you for impacting us”, “GISA Team, this training is an eye-opener to so many of the trainees, the course was delivered with passion. We believe that UNODC will not rest on its oars until this golden knowledge goes viral among the teachers in Lagos state schools and Nigeria as a whole. We the trainees will not also relent in bringing about the desired changes in the school communities and in society at large through the knowledge acquired here”, “on behalf of my team, I say a big thank you to the project director, the project manager, all the facilitators for the knowledge you impacted in us through this training. I pray the Lord will continue to enlarge your coasts and use all of us to be agents of change in our generation in Jesus name”.

GISA-UNODC Project – Quarterly Review

Three quarterly review meetings of monitoring officers and the SAPO coordinators were held in the second, third and fourth quarters of the year. The project monitoring team comprises of GISA staff, Coordinators of teachers in the respective schools and representatives of the Ministries of Education, Health, Youth and Social development.

Other components of the GISA-UNODC Project

Other components of the GISA-UNODC project includes the training of Peer Educators by SAPOs; the development of school policy on substance use prevention; establishment of GISA Prevention Leadership Action Team (GPLAT) comprising of SAPOs, representatives of the students, school management, parents and members of the neighbouring communities; the delivering of prevention skills talk by the Peer Educators at the school assemblies and other school events; the inauguration of Drug Free Skills School Club (DFSSC) and talk by SAPOs during the Parents, Teachers Forum/meeting. All of these were monitored by the monitoring team. In addition, baseline and post intervention surveys were conducted for both the students and teachers. These are being analyzed for publication and experience sharing.

GISA-ECOWAS UPC training in Ghana

GISA commenced UPC training of trainers in Accra, Ghana with 25 National Trainers. The trainings were facilitated by the Founder/ Executive Director of GISA, Dr. Martin Agwogie and Mr. Sylvester Koomson of the Ghana Narcotics Control Board. The training started with the UPC Core in the second quarter of the year and continued with the family and community-based specialty courses in the 3rd and 4th quarters of the year.

 Training on the Concept of Evidence-Based Substance Use Prevention in Lagos state

The last training of the year 2021 was conducted for the Lagos State Inter – Ministerial Drug Abuse Control Committee (LSIDACC) through the Lagos State Ministry of Health (LSMOH). The training was in two batches with a total of 50 participants. Participants were staff of Lagos state Ministries of Health and Education, and staff from the National Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA).

Other activities of GISA within the year

As part of the other activities, GISA was engaged by the Nigeria Liquified Natural Gas (NLNG) to conduct skills-based substance use prevention training for students of selected secondary schools in Nigeria. The two days training was conducted in September 2021. This was a follow up to similar training conducted in 2020. At the end of the training sessions, just like the previous year, the students and management of NLNG were impressed. Considering the work of GISA in school-based substance use prevention and the experience of the Founder/ Executive Director of GISA, Dr. Martin Agwogie, GISA was nominated to represent  Vienna NGO Committee on Drugs (VNGOC) for the development of UNODC Guiding Document on the Role of Law Enforcement Officers in Drug Use Prevention within the School Settings. In view of this, Dr. Agwogie joined the expert consultative group meeting coordinated by the UNODC, Vienna office with experts from different countries as members of the group. This commenced in July 2021. Similarly, Dr. Martin Agwogie was invited to join the Prevention Experts Advisory Group (PEAG) of the United States Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement affairs (INL). Within the period, Dr. Agwogie joined several meetings of the group to review the Substance Use Prevention Curriculum for Youth. The Founder/Executive Director, GISA, Dr. Martin Agwogie was invited to the 2nd Annual DFAM Drug and Substance Abuse Conference held on the 18th of February 2021 in Abuja as the Keynote Speaker. The theme of the conference was “Youth and The Region’s Big Issue; Drug Abuse”. Dr. Agwogie spoke on the topic Evidence-based Substance Use Prevention and Practice where he highlighted the major risk and protective factors associated with substance use and abuse in the region, and the way forward which include the development of a culture of substance use prevention across communities and settings in the region which is one of the advocacies of GISA.
During the last quarter of the year, GISA staff supported the International Society of Substance Use Prevention and Treatment Professionals (ISSUP Nigeria Chapter) towards a successful 3rd Annual Conference/General Meeting which was held on the 26th of October 2021 in recognition of the role of the Founder/ Executive Director of GISA as the President of ISSUP Nigeria Chapter.

Journal Publications

As part of the components of the vision of GISA to promote evidence-based interventions, two journal articles that demonstrated the work of GISA were published. These were: Agwogie, M. O., & Bryant, N. (2021). Implementing and evaluating the UPC to promote capacity building among drug demand reduction practitioners in Nigeria: Lessons learned and future directions. Adiktologie, 21 (4), 219–228. https://doi.org/10.35198/01-2021-004-0003 This article highlights the development of the Universal Prevention Curriculum in Nigeria and the outcome evaluation of participants response to the training. The second article, Ola, B. A., Olibamoyo, O., Audu, M., Ezenwa, M., Goar, S. G., Auwal, S., Orjiakor, T. C., & Agwogie, M. (2021). Developing curriculum for the training of non-specialist in addiction studies in Nigerian universities: The journey of Nigerian ICUDDR team. Adiktologie, 21 (4), 251–259. https://doi.org/10.35198/01-2021-004-0004 This article highlight efforts towards the development of addiction program in Nigeria for which GISA played a major role in mobilizing stakeholders for the ICUDDR conference in Nairobi Kenya as part of its role in providing advocacy for the introduction of addiction program in higher institutions of learning in Africa. This article was co-authored with colleagues who were in Nairobi
in 2018. In addition to these publications, GISA also shared its experience via webinars and poster presentations.

Conclusion

The year 2021 started and ended with great activities and impacts. Some of the activities are to continue in the coming year 2022. In particular, it was a great experience developing initiatives for substance use prevention in the school setting through the UDODC-DAPC grant project. This initiative has spiraled attention from both the government and other stakeholders in the field of drug demand reduction. We have started to document our efforts for experience sharing at conferences and Journal publications. We also look forward to opportunities to replicate the project in other states in Nigeria. It is important to note that the Lagos state government was full of appreciation to the UNODC and GISA for this project. GISA also expresses appreciation to UNODC for the grant approval and impacts made by the project. It is our commitment to sustain the gains made from this project for the good of the society. We also appreciate ECOWAS, Lagos state and other stakeholders who supported us in 2021. We look forward to greater collaboration in the years 2022

 GLOBAL INITIATIVE ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE (GISA)

17, AYODELE FANOIKI STREET. MAGODO GRA I, ISHERI, IKEJA, LAGOS STATE.

QUARTERLY REPORT


OCTOBER – DECEMBER 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction

The fourth quarter of the year 2020 (October to December) started with arrangements for the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) Core and the School-based Specialty Track trainings. These were the training programmes scheduled for the fourth quarter of the year.

Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) Core training, 5th–10th October 2020 and School- Based Track 30th November–5th December 2020

The UPC Core training was held between 5th and 10th of October with a total of 23 participants while the School-based Specialty Track held between 30th November and 5th of December 2020 had 10 participants. Each of the trainings started with an opening ceremony followed by objectives of the training and breakdown of its activities clearly stated. The Founder/Executive Director GISA, Dr, Martin Agwogie charged participants to be committed to the training and learning. He encouraged them to participate in the various group exercises, presentation and share their experiences. Participants were from both governments, private and non-governmental organisations.

Post Training Evaluation, Pre and Post Test

As in previous trainings, there were pre and post-training assessments to evaluate the knowledge gain by the participants. Post-training evaluation also included evaluation of the training materials, programme contents, knowledge, skills and experience of participants after the training.

Overall Training Experience

Generally, and like previous trainings, participants rated the training high. Some of the words used to describe their general experience includes fantastic, excellent, very educative, quite rewarding, very interactive, rich content materials, insightful with attestation of relevance to their jobs and families. The participants also appreciated the new dimension to delivering substance use prevention interventions. Participants in the school-based specialty track training were particularly excited with highlights on the importance of good classroom climate for prevention intervention, setting policies in schools for substance use prevention, the Prevention Leadership Action Team (PLAT), communication skills and respect for the opinions of others, school connectedness, involvement of stakeholders in substance use prevention in the school setting, and the need to involve students as strategy document creation policy for substance use prevention. However,

some participants pointed out issues related to communication network and inability to interact compared to in persons training.

Participants hope to effect changes in the following areas: shift focus from the students to the school environment and system, not grouping all students together in prevention but considering the universal, selective and indicative populations, not exposing drugs physically and how they are used to the students, involve active participation and skills transfer when relating with students, minimise assumptions instead focus on evidence-based approach to substance use prevention, more conscious of the method of delivery interventions, develop prevention policy, involvement of students and teachers in school substance use prevention from the stage of planning, stop exaggerated messages, develop persuasive speech ahead of meeting with the school authority,

Barriers to Effecting Change

Participants where asked question on what will make change difficult and they identified the following as impediments to the realisation of their objectives: finance, time constraints, challenges associated with collaboration, organisational leadership challenge, stigma associated with substance use, bureaucracy and leadership in organisations and government policies. Some participants in the school-based specialty track requested for more local evidence on effectiveness of the different models exposed to in the training and more training on life skills. Going forward, participants recommended that case studies be x-rayed in subsequent trainings. For instance, a school where school-based intervention has been carried out can be reviewed as a case study. There should be more interactive group activities and need for physical training. Others had words of commendation for GISA such as thanks for the impactful training, well done GISA, keep the good going. Each of the trainings ended with words of encouragement from the Founder/Executive Director of GISA to the participants to go back to their various organisation, community and put into practice the knowledge and skills gained from the trainings. Certificates of participation with credit hours were presented to the participants.

Other Activities of GISA in the Fourth Quarter of 2020

Within the last quarter of 2020, GISA received a grant from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Drug Abuse Prevention Centre (DAPC) Vienna, on substance use prevention among secondary school students of selected public and private schools in Lagos state, Nigeria.

 

The project will be executed in 12 public and 6 private secondary schools in Lagos state for a period of 12 months.

The Founder/ Executive Director GISA who is also the President of the International Society of Substance Use Prevention and Treatment Professionals (ISSUP Nigeria Chapter), led members of the Association to a virtual Conference/ Annual General Meeting held in October 2020.

Conclusion

The fourth quarter ended with huge relief from apprehension of COVID-19 pandemic which has threatened public gatherings. It also brought hope of conducting training on substance use prevention interventions virtually in Nigeria which is believed will consolidate the capacity building drive of GISA. The coming year is also coming with activities and innovations in delivering evidence-based substance use prevention through the UNODC grant.

 

 GLOBAL INITIATIVE ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE (GISA)

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

17, AYODELE FANOIKI STREET. MAGODO GRA I, ISHERI, IKEJA, LAGOS STATE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction

The year 2020 started with great prospects for Global initiative on Substance Abuse (GISA) as arrangements for the continuation of the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) Core and specialty tracks were proposed for the year. Even though this prospect was dimmed early in the year with the outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic, GISA was able to conduct some trainings with innovations.

Trainings

 

Within the first quarter of the year (January to March 2020), two trainings were conducted: the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) Core course, January 27th – 1st of February and March 9th – 14th, 2020.

GISA

The second quarter of the year (April – June) was characterized by lockdown and restriction of movements due to COVID- 19 global pandemic. This made it difficult for GISA to organize any training or embark on any activities. It also became difficult to meet the increasing demand for capacity building on evidence-based substance use prevention for which GISA has become a reference point. The period gave GISA the opportunity to think outside the box with the introduction of virtual delivering of trainings. In the 3rd quarter of the year (July – September), three virtual trainings were conducted: the UPC Core, July 20th to 25th and August 17th to 22nd, and the workplace substance use prevention, management and policy, September 1st to 3rd 2020.

The last quarter of the year witnessed two trainings: the UPC Core, between 5th and 10th of October and the school-based speciality track, between 30th November and 5th of December 2020. A total of 142 drug demand reduction practitioners in Nigeria were impacted in the year 2020 by GISA.

Each of the trainings started with an opening ceremony where the Founder/Executive Director GISA, Dr, Martin Agwogie charged participants to be committed to the training and learning. He encouraged participants to be involve in the various group exercises and share their experiences in line with adult learning principles. Participants in each of the trainings were drawn from both government, private and non-governmental organisations from different parts of the country. Each of the trainings ended with words of encouragement from Dr. Agwogie to the participants to go back to their various operational domains and put into practice the knowledge and skills gained from the trainings. Certificates of participation with credit hours were presented to the participants.

Post Training Evaluation, Pre and Post Test

Each of the trainings started with a pre-test and ended with a post-test. In addition, the training materials and programme contents were also evaluated. In some of the trainings, the facilitators were also independently assessed by the participants with respect to knowledge of the subject

 

matter, delivery skills/supervision, time  management, participant’s engagement, and general demeanor. Details of these are provided in the quarterly reports.

Knowledge, Skills and Experience of Participants after the Training

 

Broad feedback from each of the trainings were provided on the knowledge, skills and experience gathered at the end of the training. Details of these are provided in the quarterly report and are not significantly different from feedback as documented in the 2019 annual report.

Other activities of GISA for the year

 

In recognition of the efforts of the Founder/Executive Director of GISA, Dr. Martin O. Agwogie through the activities of GISA, he was awarded a Distinguished Humphrey Leadership Fellow and a Fellow of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). In view of this, he was in the United States within the 1st quarter of the year. This was immediately followed by his participation at the 63rd session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) in Vienna, Austria in March 2020. Other activities included paper presentation at the virtual conference of ICUDDR held in July, 2020 where he spoke on UPC implementation in Nigeria: challenges and opportunities prior, during and post COVID-19. GISA also collaborated with the Nigerian Liquified Natural Gas (NLNG) on adolescent programme where GISA made a presentation on substance use and skills for prevention. Dr. Agwogie also coordinated and presided over the virtual conference of ISSUP Nigeria Chapter in his capacity as the President. The conference was held in October 2020.

Before end of the year, GISA received a grant approval from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Drug Abuse Prevention Centre (DAPC) Vienna, on substance use prevention among secondary school students of selected public and private schools in Lagos state, Nigeria. The project was expected to be executed in 12 public and 6 private secondary schools in Lagos state for a period of 12 months.

 

Feedback from participants

 

Some of the comments by participants on their overall learning experience from the trainings were, awesome, excellent, great, good, highly informative, stimulating, insightful, highly fulfilling, impressive, superb and more than imagination. The following were highlighted as part of what they liked most about the training; the content of the training materials, the trainers, their dept of knowledge, confidence in delivering prevention interventions, use of prevention terminologies and high level of expertise displayed during the training. Specifically on the workplace training, participants were impressed with knowledge on the business case for substance use prevention in the workplace, drug policy development in the workplace, monitoring and evaluation process, exposure to UNODC workplace policy standard. Similarly, participants in the school-based specialty track training were particularly excited with highlights on the importance of good classroom climate for prevention intervention, setting policies in schools for substance use prevention, the Prevention Leadership Action Team (PLAT), communication skills and respect for the opinions of others, school connectedness, involvement of stakeholders in substance use prevention in the school setting, and the need to involve students as strategy document creation policy for substance use prevention. However, the following were listed among what participants like least about the training: insufficient time, network issues for the virtual trainings and challenges with group coordination unlike the in-person trainings.

While appreciating the GISA team for the great job, participants identified some barriers to putting their knowledge into practice to include: limited policies to support the delivering of evidence- based prevention interventions, lack of management support, limited financial and human resources even among supervisors, the issue of stigma associated with drug use, lack of political

 

will to address drug issues by stakeholders, limited statistical data to support evidence-based prevention interventions and religious beliefs.

Expected Changes and Barriers

 

Participants from each of the trainings expressed the hope to effect changes  following the knowledge gained from the training. With particular reference to the school-based training, participants desire to shift prevention focus from the students to the school environment and system, not grouping all students together in prevention but considering the universal, selective and indicative populations, not exposing drugs physically and how they are used to the students, involve active participation and skills transfer when relating with students, minimise assumptions instead focus on evidence-based approach to substance use prevention, more conscious of the method of delivery interventions, develop prevention policy, involvement of students and teachers in school substance use prevention from the stage of planning, stop exaggerated messages, develop persuasive speech ahead of meeting with the school authority. Despite these optimisms, participants identified the following as impediments to these realisations: finance, time constraints, challenges associated with collaboration, organisational leadership challenge, stigma associated with substance use, bureaucracy and leadership in organisations and government policies. Furthermore, some participants requested for more local evidence on effectiveness of the different models exposed to in the training and more training on life skills.

Conclusion

 

The year 2020 was a challenging one. The COVID-19 pandemic came at a time when GISA was already consolidating its capacity build initiatives with great interest across the country. However, the transition from in-person training to virtual training arising from the COVID-19 pandemic with the successes recorded was very encouraging and demonstrate the need to consolidate virtual

 

training. While the virtual training came with some challenges such as network issues, limited time and inability to interact more as the case with the in-person training, some benefits were recorded such as travel inconveniences and cost associated with in-person training. The number of participants also demonstrated the eagerness to be part of the GISA capacity building project. We shall continue to improve on the virtual training delivering and conduct in-person training as it becomes necessary and feasible.

 

 GLOBAL INITIATIVE ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE (GISA)

17, AYODELE FANOIKI STREET. MAGODO GRA I, ISHERI, IKEJA, LAGOS STATE.

 

 

 

ANNUAL REPORT

JULY – SEPTEMBER 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction

The third quarter of the year 2020 (July – September) started with extra preparations for the first virtual training by GISA on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) which was the first of its kind. Different channels were used to inform the public on the transition from in-person to virtual training during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Third quarter trainings were scheduled as follows:

 

    1. Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC), July 20th to 25th
    1. Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC), August 17th to 22nd
    1. Workplace Substance Use Prevention, Management, and Policy, September 1st to 3rd 2020

 

Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) July 20th to 25th 2020

 

The first UPC virtual training attracted thirty (30) participants. It was a great encouragement for GISA and an acknowledgment of the yearnings for capacity on evidence-based substance use prevention from GISA.

The training started on the 20th of July 2020 with an opening ceremony followed by objectives of the training and a breakdown of its activities. During the opening ceremony, the participants introduced themselves and asked questions of interest. The training was carried out by GISA resource persons, including the Founder/Executive Director of GISA, Dr. Martin O. Agwogie.

Like the previous UPC trainings, the objectives of the training were to provide participants with requisite Evidence-Based (EB) knowledge, skills, and competencies for substance use prevention. The training materials consisted of ten modules, the physiology, and pharmacology of psychoactive substances, which introduces necessary information on psychoactive substances and effects on the brain and human body; the critical themes of the Universal Prevention Curriculum; prevention science; critical theories in prevention; evidence-based prevention interventions and policies; the

 

implementation cycle; skills and competencies for prevention professionals; code of ethics for prevention professionals and application of the training to professional practice and development. The training ended on the 25th of July 2020.

The success of the first training and the excitement by participants raised hope for continued UPC virtual trainings during the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequently.

Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) August 17th to 22nd 2020

 On the 17th of August 2020 the second UPC virtual training started with an opening ceremony and ended on the 22nd of August 2020 with a closing ceremony and presentation of certificates.

Like the previous virtual training, the opening ceremony was used to introduce participants to what the UPC is about as well as the expectations of participants at the training. Participants also used the period to introduce themselves and asked questions.

Workplace Substance Use Prevention, Management, and Policy, September 1st to 3rd 2020

After the August UPC Core training, preparation continued for the second batch of training on substance use prevention, management, and policy in the workplace organised by GISA which was also the first virtual training to be conducted by GISA on Workplace prevention. All the requirements were put in place by GISA for the success of the training. On the 1st of September 2020, the training was kickstarted by an opening ceremony which was coordinated by GISA with a total number of 16 participants. During the opening ceremony, all participants were able to introduce themself and got to know one another. The training started immediately after the opening ceremony.

The training consisted of introduction to workplace prevention interventions, a national and global overview of substance use, physiology, and pharmacology of psychoactive substances, implication of pharmacology & physiology of psychoactive substances for prevention, an overview of the problem of substance use in the workplace, the role of workplace in substance use prevention, workplace risk and protective factors for substance use, justifications for substance use prevention in the workplace, cultural context of workplace in the society, workplace individuals and family connections, specific workplace characteristics and substance use, workplace protective characteristics, why workplace is an important setting for substance use prevention programme, the ‘’business case’’ for workplace substance use prevention, drug testing in the context of a comprehensive approach to substance use prevention in the workplace, key components and development of workplace substance use prevention policies, harm reduction, drug free workplace, overview of UNODC/WHO International Standards on Drug Use Prevention, implementing and adapting workplace-based programmes, overview of the International Labour Organization (ILO) guidelines on management of alcohol and drug-related issues in the workplace, monitoring and evaluations of evidence-based substance use prevention programme outcomes and the significances, identifying, and providing help to an employee with substance use disorder. The training was a successful one and a great achievement to GISA.

Other activities by GISA

 Within the period, the Founder/Executive Director presented a paper at the virtual conference of ICUDDR held between July 13th and 15th, 2020. He spoke on UPC implementation in Nigeria: challenges and opportunities prior, during, and post COVID-19. The presentation was followed by a panel session with 2 other colleagues from Nigeria, Prof. Bola A. Ola, and Dr. Ehigiator Adayonfo. The Founder/Executive Director also coordinated and presided over the virtual conference of the ISSUP Nigeria Chapter in his capacity as the President. The conference was held on the 20th of October 2020

    Post Training Evaluation Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) Core. Evaluation of Training Materials and Programme Contents for July and August 2020

 

STATEMENT

Strongly Agree: f (%) Agree: f (%) Undecided: f (%) Disagree: f (%) Strongly Disagree: f (%)
The training objectives are clearly stated and measurable 33 (89.19) 4(10.81) 0.00 0.00

The course content is consistent with the

training objectives and outcomes

31 (83.78) 6 (16.22) 0.00 0.00
The course content provides up to date information 25 (67.57) 9 (24.32) 3 (8.11) 0.00
The course content is relevant to my work 27 (72.97) 10 (27.03) 0.00 0.00

The number of modules is sufficient to

achieve the objectives of the goal

24 (64.86) 13(35.14) 0.00 0.00
The sequence of the module is organized and easy to follow 21 (56.76) 14 (37.83) 2 (5.41) 0.00
The training methodology used promote maximum learning experience 19 (51.35) 15 (40.54) 3 (8.11) 0.00
The training activities reinforce the learning of important concept 27 (72.97) 10 (27.03) 0.00 0.00

Training approach is well-balanced in terms of contents, activities and

interaction

24 (64.86) 10 (27.03) 2 (5.41) 1 (2.70)
The time allotted is sufficient to cover the topics and exercises in the module 10 (27.03) 10 (27.03) 5 (13.51) 12 (32.43)
Sufficient time is allotted to accommodate trainees’ enquiries 16 (43.24) 12 (32.44) 5 (13.51) 4 (10.81)
Training materials are adequate and useful 19 (51.35) 16 (43.24) 2 (5.41) 0.00
The illustration used is relevant and reinforce important concepts 24 (64.86) 10 (27.03) 3 (8.11) 0.00
The graphics are culturally appropriate 21 (56.76) 13 (35.13) 3 (8.11) 0.00
The training has stimulated and provided me with new insights and knowledge about substance use prevention 31 (83.78) 6 (16.22) 0.00 0.00

I feel better equipped to provide

evidence-based substance use prevention

28 (75.68) 9 (24.32) 0.00 0.00
I believe this training will be useful in my work environment 25 (67.57) 12 (32.43) 0.00 0.00

This training has stimulated me to inform

others about what I have learnt in these past days

21 (56.76) 16 (43.24) 0.00 0.00
I have learnt new things that I feel I will be able to pass onto others 25 (67.57) 12 (32.43) 0.00 0.00

 

I feel more capable to discussing substance abuse prevention with people and organizations in this field 24 (64.87) 12 (32.43) 1 (2.70) 0.00

.

Knowledge, Skills, and Experience of Participants after the Training

 

S/N Please grade accordingly: Excellent

Very

Good

Good Fair Poor
i. Communication/Information prior to the training 13 (35.13) 14 (37.84) 8 (21.62) 2 (5.41)
ii. Group Selection (Participants) 15 (40.54) 16 (43.24) 4 (10.81) 2 (5.41)
iii. Cost for the training (comparatively) 9 (24.32) 17 (45.95) 8 (21.62) 3 (8.11)
iv. Technical Inputs 13 (35.13) 14 (37.84) 6 (16.21) 4 (10.81)

Feedback from participants

 Some of the comments by participants on their overall learning experience from the training were, awesome, excellent, great, good, highly informative, stimulating, insightful, highly fulfilling, impressive, superb and more than imagination. The following were highlighted as part of what they liked most about the training; the content of the training materials, the trainers, their dept of knowledge, use of prevention terminologies and high level of expertise displayed during the training course content. However, the following were listed among what participants like least about the training: insufficient time, network issues and challenges with group coordination unlike the in-person trainings.

While appreciating the GISA team for the great job, participants identified some barriers to putting their knowledge into practice to include: limited policies to support the delivering of evidence- based prevention interventions, lack of management support, limited financial and human resources even among supervisors, the issue of stigma associated with drug use, lack of political will to address drug issues by stakeholders, limited statistical data to support evidence-based prevention interventions and religious beliefs.

Workplace Training programme content: Evaluation of Training Materials and Programme Contents for September 2020 training

 

STATEMENT

Strongly Agree: f (%) Agree: f (%) Undecided: f (%) Disagree: f (%) Strongly Disagree: f (%)

The training objectives are clearly stated

and measurable

 

10 (83.33)

 

2 (16.67)

The course content is consistent with the training objectives and outcomes

 

10 (83.33)

 

2 (16.67)

The course content provides up to date information

 

7 (58.33)

 

5 (41.67)

The course content is relevant to my work 9 (75) 2 (16.67) 1 (8.33)
The number of modules is sufficient to achieve the objectives of the goal

 

7 (58.33)

 

5 (41.67)

The sequence of the module is organized and easy to follow

 

9 (75)

 

3 (25)

The training methodology used promote maximum learning experience

 

7 (58.33)

 

5 (41.67)

The training activities reinforce the

learning of important concept

 

7 (58.33)

 

5 (41.67)

Training approach is well-balanced in terms of contents, activities and interaction

 

 

7 (58.33)

 

 

4 (33.33)

 

 

1 (8.33)

The time allotted is sufficient to cover the topics and exercises in the module

 

5 (41.67)

 

5 (41.67)

 

2 (16.67)

Sufficient time is allotted to

accommodate trainees’ enquiries

 

7 (58.33)

 

5 (41.67)

Training materials are adequate and useful

 

8 (66.67)

 

3 (25)

 

1 (8.33)

The illustration used is relevant and reinforce important concepts

 

8 (66.67)

 

4 (33.33)

The graphics are culturally appropriate 7 (58.33) 5 (41.67)
The training has stimulated and provided me with new insights and knowledge about substance use prevention

 

 

9 (75)

 

 

3 (25)

I feel better equipped to provide evidence

based substance use prevention

 

9 (75)

 

3 (25)

I believe this training will be useful in my work environment

 

10 (83.33)

 

2 (16.67)

This training has stimulated me to inform others about what I have learnt in these past days

 

 

11 (91.67)

 

 

1 (8.33)

I have learnt new things that I feel I will be able to pass onto others

 

12 (100)

I feel more capable to discussing substance abuse prevention with people and organizations in this field

 

 

9 (75)

 

 

3 (25)

Knowledge, Skills and Experience of Participants after the Training

S/N Please grade accordingly: Excellent Very Good Good Fair Poor
i. Communication/Information prior to the training 7 (58.33) 5 (41.67)
ii. Group Selection (Participants) 7 (58.33) 4 (33.33) 1(8.33)
iii. Cost for the training (comparatively) 4 (33.33) 3 (25) 5 (41.67)
iv. Technical Inputs 5 (41.67) 5 (41.67) 2 (16.66)

Feedback from participants

 The following words were used by participants to describe their learning experience: great, very satisfactory, excellent, good, insightful and informative, very good, fantastic, educative and impactive. One of the participants puts it this way, I was wondering how it was going to look like, but when we started, it was an eye opening. The materials provided are wonderful, each group was up to the task. Another participant noted, my overall experience about substance abuse prevention as gone higher. The training increases my confidence in the field of substance abuse prevention interventions in the workplace.

Participants identified the following as part of what they liked most about the training: the bringing together of people of like minds who are looking forward to a drug free nation, the business case for substance use prevention in the workplace, drug policy development in the workplace, monitoring and evaluation process, allowing participants to be part of the training, exposure to UNODC workplace policy standard, the effective communication, more confidence in delivering prevention interventions particularly in the workplace, human disposition and the mode of delivery by the facilitators.

 

The following were the areas highlighted by the participants that they liked least, the inability to come together in an in-person training, more explanation on drug policy development in the workplace, limited time, network fluctuations. Most of the participants, however, noted that everything was fantastic with the following words of commendations for GISA. Excellent job by the facilitators, it was worthwhile. The training is relevant, extremely rewarding and timely, God bless GISA. Some participants recommended quarterly training programme on the topic to expand capacity.

 

Conclusion

 The transition from in-person training to virtual training arising from the COVID-19 pandemic with the successes recorded was very encouraging and demonstrate the need to consolidate virtual training. While the virtual training came with some challenges such as network issues, limited time and inability to interact more as the case with the in-person training, some benefits were recorded such as travel inconveniences and cost associated with in-person training. The number of participants also demonstrated the eagerness to be part of the GISA capacity building project. We shall continue to improve on the virtual training delivering and conduct in-person training as it becomes necessary and feasible.

 GLOBAL INITIATIVE ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE (GISA)

17, AYODELE FANOIKI STREET. MAGODO GRA I, ISHERI, IKEJA, LAGOS STATE.

 

 

 

2019 ANNUAL REPORT

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction

The year 2019 started on a high note and with great expectations for the commencement of the Universal Prevention Curriculum for Substance Use Disorders (UPC) trainings in Nigeria. The training started with the training of national trainers held between January 15 and 24, 2019. The commencement of the UPC training was historic and with so much excitement coming six years after the first attempt to introduce UPC in Nigeria. The training started with opening ceremony witnessed by dignitaries from the National Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA), National Agency for Food and Drugs Administration and Control (NAFDAC), United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), Lagos State Ministry of Youths and Social Development, among others. Participants at the training were professors and Doctor of medicine, psychology and guidance counselling, pharmacists, lecturers and principals of secondary schools. Experts in drug demand reduction from the drug law enforcement and regulatory agencies like the NDLEA and NAFDAC, representatives of State Drug Control Committees and Ministries of Education and Youth Development were also in attendance. The faith-based organizations were not left out. Equally represented were experts in drug demand reduction from the Non-Governmental and Civil Society Organizations as well as the youth population. The training was organized by Global Initiative on Substance Abuse (GISA) in collaboration with The Colombo Plan, Drug Advisory Programme (DAP) and the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL), United States. It was the first and comprehensive evidence-based substance use prevention training in Nigeria. Within the year (July), the 40 national trainers also received training on school-based specialty track of the UPC.

Within the year under review, 10 batches of UPC trainings were conducted with a total of 158 practitioners imparted on evidence-based substance use prevention in Nigeria. One of the trainings was dedicated to the training of selected secondary school principals in Lagos state. The training was held between 5th and 11th of May 2019. The opening ceremony was attended by dignitaries from the Lagos State Ministry of Education led by the Tutor General/Permanent Secretary Education District 1, Dr. Yinka Ayandele. It was the first and all-inclusive evidence-based substance use prevention training organized for secondary school principals in Lagos state, Nigeria. It was conducted at relatively no cost to the participants.

National Training of Trainers on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) School-Based Specialty Track

Following the success of the commencement of the UPC core training in Nigeria, GISA in collaboration with the Colombo Plan Drug Advisory Programme with the support of Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL), United States commenced the school track training of trainers with 40 national trainers. The training, which was the first of its kind in Nigeria started with an opening ceremony witnessed by the Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry of Education who was represented by the Director, Basic and Secondary Education, Dr. Lami Amodu, the Public Affairs Officer, U.S. Consular General Lagos, Mr. Russell Brooks, the Director of Pharmaceutical Services Lagos State Ministry of Health and Chairman Lagos State Inter-Ministerial Drug Abuse Control Committee, Dr. Moyosore Adejumo, the Chairman Lagos State Teaching Service Board who was represented by the Director, Teachers Education and Capacity Development Mr. Kehinde S. Oladosu,  representative of the Permanent Secretary, Lagos State Ministry of Education, Education District 1, among other dignitaries. Since then, GISA has extended the school track UPC training to practitioners

       Mr. Kehinde S. Oladosu, Mr. Russell Brooks and Dr. Martin Agwogie

Knowledge, Skills and Experience of Participants After the Training

The feedback on the knowledge, skills and experience gathered from the participants at the end of the training includes:

  • the importance of Evidence Based Intervention (EBI) for substance use disorders
  • skills to develop when engaging in evidence-based prevention and the importance of these skills which are the missing link in substance use prevention
  • the importance of planning, monitoring and evaluation of interventions in substance use prevention
  • the consequences of gut feelings in substance use prevention
  • the need for resource assessment through data gathering/research to kick start any prevention process. And how to identify needs and resources in a community
  • the need for professional code of ethics and professionalism in drug demand reduction
  • better understanding and coming to terms with happenings around community
  • better decision-making process through the implementation cycle
  • Knowledge about the developmental stages of children, school-based interventions and how to introduce substance use prevention in the school settings
  • how to introduce an evidence-based intervention into an existing programme
  • importance of fidelity in the implementation of evidence-based programmes
  • parenting and teaching of pro-social skills in place of just “say no to drug” approach
  • different prevention theories and applications
  • learnt about different coping skills
  • identify methods, strength and sustainability of interventions
  • the importance early prevention intervention
  • learnt not to focus on the negative aspect of substance use but on improving decision making and life-skills
  • how to identify target population (universal, selective or indicated)
  • how to select and build team for effective intervention
  • better informed about substance use and different prevention strategies
  • informed about helping persons who use drugs out of their substance use without subjecting them to punishment.
  • understood that prevention science is key to the reduction of substance use in the community
  • gained confidence to talk about prevention of substance use using evidence-based approach
  • the need to increase professional teamwork and analytical skills
  • importance of the enforcement of policies in substance use prevention
  • better understanding of the behavioural patterns of individual
  • how to diffuse information on substance use to public without causing harm.

 Things to Change Based on Training Experience

Trainees listed things they would like to change based on their experience from the training:

  • change perception about drug use and persons who use drugs
  • change orientation on how to provide intervention
  • change knowledge about and the importance of parenting skills
  • positively convince boss/supervisors on evidence-based substance use prevention interventions
  • change the way prevention activities have been conducted in the past such as style and language of sensitization or programme implementation
  • avoid the use of scare tactics but teaching necessary skills
  • follow the implementation circle religiously
  • positive mindset not to do harm to clients but do good
  • change approach to monitoring and evaluation by ensuring proper monitoring from the beginning to the last stage of intervention
  • implement intervention with fidelity and with ethical standards
  • improve interpersonal skills among youths
  • change the initial mind-set of getting substance users arrested as deterrent. Instead, provide help/referral for treatment and counselling services.
  • avoid using persons in recovering from substance use during prevention intervention.
  • change people’s perception about substance use
  • change in the orientation and strategies on how to provide interventions for different population of drug users
  • improve personal parenting skills
  • build the confidence of colleagues and encourage them to use evidence-based approach in tackling substance use issues
  • lay more emphasis on skills rather than mentioning names of substance and their consequences
  • modify content delivered to different age bracket
  • change strategies on empowering teachers and counsellors to implement substance use prevention in schools
  • allocate more time for interaction and case study as against just passing information
  • avoid generalisation and assumptions of the use of substance, and gut feelings.
  • improve on the use of appropriate terminologies in disseminating information on substance use

 

Difficulties Facing Change and Use of Experience

Participants also outlined some difficulties or challenges that they might face applying the new knowledge and skills in their workplace. These include:

  • limited financial resources to support continuous training
  • lack of cooperation of colleagues, superiors/supervisors
  • issues related to culture of target audience and community
  • being conservative on usual pattern of delivery
  • difficulties in getting colleagues to support evidence-based prevention intervention
  • challenges with some school policies
  • challenges with government policies
  • apathy to new initiatives and change
  • existing systems
  • bureaucracy and protocols in different settings
  • difficulties in getting the approval of the community members
  • long procedure before delivering interventions
  • impatient of sponsors/donors
  • work environment could pose a challenge to using evidence-based prevention skills and knowledge gained
  • spiritual interpretation of substance use by some group of persons
  • difficulties in establishing collaboration with practitioners and professionals for programme implementation
  • limited number of persons who have acquired knowledge and skills on evidence-based prevention intervention

 

Overall Training Experience

Overall review of participants’ experiences shows that most of the participants indicated that:

  • the training was interactive, enlightening, exciting, impactful, great, wonderful, fun, impressive and worth the while
  • participants were able to have better understanding of new concepts
  • participants had new knowledge on Evidence Based Interventions (EBI) and how to implement them after training was acquired
  • the knowledge on substance prevention was worth the time
  • exposure to prevention and implementation of substance use prevention programmes was educating and refreshing
  • the method of delivery was adequate; trainers were very competent
  • training was well organized
  • facilitators were able to differentiate treatment from prevention
  • the training venue and curriculum were excellent and relevant, strict and effective time management,
  • the combination of facilitators was very good as they complement each other
  • learnt a lot and looking forward to more trainings in GISA
  • GISA need to be commended and urged to continue educating the society on substance use and prevention as their effort will ultimately erase the pervading ignorance in the society; and organizing this training in other parts of the country.
  • thank you so much for this rare opportunity of learning from the experts, GISA staff, and fellow participants
  • the program is intensive, immersive and amazing.
  • they emphasize on the method of delivery which was immensely satisfactory and enjoyable

         Table 1:   Annual Training Programme Content: Evaluation of Training Materials                                                  and Programme Contents for 2019 Training

STATEMENT Strongly Agree: f (%) Agree: f (%)

Undecided:

f (%)

Disagree:

f (%)

Strongly Disagree: f (%)
The training objectives are clearly stated and measurable 106 (80.91) 25 (19.09)
The course content is consistent with the training objectives and outcomes 102 (77.86) 29 (22.14)
The course content provides up to date information 85 (64.88) 42 (32.07) 4 (3.05)
The course content is relevant to my work 93 (70.99) 36 (27.48) 2 (1.53)
The number of modules is sufficient to achieve the objectives of the goal 76 (58.02) 49 (37.40) 6 (4.58)
The sequence of the module is organized and easy to follow 90 (68.71) 38 (29.00) 3 (2.29)
The training methodology used promote maximum learning experience 84 (64.13) 47 (35.87)
The training activities reinforce the learning of important concept 98 (74.81) 32 (24.43) 1 (0.76)
Training approach is well-balanced in terms of contents, activities and interaction 94 (71.76) 36 (27.48) 1 (0.76)
The time allotted is sufficient to cover the topics and exercises in the module 45 (34.36) 63 (48.09) 12 (9.16) 10 (7.63) 1 (0.76)
Sufficient time is allotted to accommodate trainees’ enquiries 57 (43.51) 58 (44.28) 15 (11.45) 1 (0.76)
Training materials are adequate and useful 94 (71.76) 33 (25.19) 3 (2.29) 1 (0.76)
The illustration used is relevant and reinforce important concepts 89 (67.94) 40 (30.54) 2 (1.52)
The graphics are culturally appropriate 56 (42.75) 60 (45.80) 14 (10.69) 1(0.76)
The training has stimulated and provided me with new insights and knowledge about substance use prevention 113 (86.26) 18 (13.74)
I feel better equipped to provide evidence-based substance use prevention 86 (65.65) 40 (30.54) 5 (3.81)
I believe this training will be useful in my work environment 103 (78.63) 27 (20.61) 1 (0.67)
This training has stimulated me to inform others about what I have learnt in these past days 102 (77.86) 27 (20.61) 2 (1.53)
I have learnt new things that I feel I will be able to pass onto others 107 (81.68) 23 (17.56) 1 (0.76)
I feel more capable to discussing substance abuse prevention with people and organizations in this field 95 (72.52) 35 (26.72) 1 (0.76)

  A. Summary of evaluation of trainers

       Figure 1: Facilitators’ Proficiency level

       SCALE: Developing = 0 – 25%; Adequate= 25 – 50%; Approaching Proficiency= 50 –       75%; Proficient= 75 – 100%.

Result from figure 1 shows that all the facilitators had mean scores of between 89.32% and 95.91%. That means the facilitators are proficient in the UPC trainings.

 

At the end of each of the trainings, participants received certificates with credit hours.

Comments and Suggestion

Participants also had a word for the facilitators. Most of them agreed that the facilitators gave room for trainee’s participation and skilled delivery method with strict and effective time management. Others stated that the trainers are very competent, nothing that the trainings were well organized with facilitators being able to differentiate between treatment and prevention. They also commended GISA for the conducive learning environment. However, some wanted more time for the presentations so that those who are new in the field of drug demand reduction can assimilate better. They also requested that more time be allocated for participants-facilitators interactions for more practical learning experiences.

Lessons Learnt from the UPC Trainings

Every training provides opportunity to learn from participants and improve on previous lessons. The broad expertise of participants from different professional backgrounds in addition to the method of delivery of the modules fetched new lessons. The group work brought about creativity and different perspective that may not have been envisaged. Similarly, new dimension of teamwork in substance use prevention was introduced. For example, module 8 which is on “The Implementation Cycle: Skills, Competences for Prevention Professionals” brought to bear the level of knowledge and skills acquired by the participants within the first few days of the training. They were able to appreciate the need for collectiveness in addressing the issues of substance use in the community. The exercises demonstrated the importance of needs and resource assessment in substance use prevention. More often, emphasis is on the needs with little or no attention to resources within the community. The exercises also conveyed the uniqueness of each community, maximum utilisation of limited resources, and ability to identify the target population for intervention. Each community for each of the trainings have sufficiently demonstrated consistencies in identifying the needs and resources within their communities as well as plan interventions.

Similarly, participants in every of the trainings have come up with different strategies to communicate experiences from the training to their colleagues and supervisors based on the peculiarity of their work environment. These have become great lessons. The developers of this Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for substance use disorders must be commended for the well-researched and developed curriculum for substance use prevention. The curriculum has proven its uniqueness in capacity building for evidence-based substance use prevention. There are observations from the participants, which we believe, will add value to the curriculum. These will be communicated through the appropriate channel for consideration in the subsequent review.

  Other Trainings By GISA in 2019

Training on Evidence-based Workplace Substance Use Prevention and Management for CBN and NPA Staff

Within the year under review, GISA in collaboration with 17 Goals Africa Initiative trained senior management staff of the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) and the Nigeria Port Authority (NPA) on evidence-based workplace substance use prevention, management and policy. At the opening ceremony, Dr. Martin Agwogie highlighted the significance of the training and called on organizations, private and public, to emulate CBN and NPA towards addressing the burden of drug use and abuse among this critical population. Above all he called on the federal government to engage experts in workplace substance use prevention and management to develop national policy on drug free workplace in Nigeria.

Participants at the training for CBN and NPA staff, 6th to 8th Nov., 2019 at Sheraton Hotel, Ikeja, Lagos state

Training on the Concept of Evidence-based Drug and Substance Use Prevention for Lagos State Ministry of Health, December 3rd and 4th, 2019

The last training of the year, 2019 was in collaboration with the Lagos State Ministry of Health and State Inter-Ministerial Drug Abuse Control Committee. Participants in the two days training on the concept of evidence-based drug and substance use prevention were health professionals and teachers drawn from different parts of Lagos state. At the opening ceremony, the Permanent Secretary of the Lagos state Ministry of health Dr. Olusegun Ogboye, encouraged participants to take advantage of the training and reflect the knowledge gained during the training in their daily activities. The opening ceremony was witnessed by the Director Pharmaceutical Services Lagos State Ministry of Health and Chairman Lagos State Inter-Ministerial Drug Abuse Control Committee, Pharm. (Dr.) Moyosore Adejumo, the Director, Pharmaceutical Inspectorate Unit Lagos State Ministry of Health, Pharm. Mosun Beckley among others.

Group Picture of Participants at the Training with Lagos State Government

Facilitators

Facilitators in most of the trainings were, the Founder/Executive Director of GISA and National Coordinator UPC, Dr. Martin Agwogie, Prof. Bola Ola, Mrs. Maria Ilugbuhi, Dr. Oluseyi Odewale, Mr. Isaac Olatunde, Mr. Remilekun Taiwo, Mr. Olatunji Erinjogunola, and Ms. Sandra Anyahaebi.

 Other Activities

Beyond UPC trainings, GISA engaged in other activities within the year including the provision of consultancy services in the area of substance use prevention, treatment and policies. The Founder/Executive Director, Dr. Martin Agwogie granted press interviews with different media houses including the Nigerian Television Authority (NTA), Lagos Television (LTV), Guardian Newspaper, The New Telegraph, Thisday Newspaper among others. Dr. Agwogie was also invited as a Keynote speaker at the Symposium on Drug and Substance Abuse in Nigeria organized by the Nigeria Academy of Pharmacy in Collaboration with The Pharmaceutical Society of Nigeria.

 

Receiving Appreciation Award from the Chairman NAP, Prince Julius Adelusi-Adeluyi (OFR)

In his capacity as the president of the International Society of Substance Use Prevention and Treatment Professionals (ISSUP Nigeria Chapter), Dr. Agwogie led a team of Nigerian representatives to the 5th Global ISSUP conference in Vienna, Austria where he also participated in the training of global trainers in Drug Demand Reduction. Relatedly and as part of GISA advocacy mandate for the International Consortium of Universities for Drug Demand Reduction (ICUDDR), Dr. Agwogie attended the 4th ICUDDR Conference in Cusco, Peru (July 22nd and 23rd, 2019). Similarly, Dr. Agwogie attended the ICUDDR Africa Catalytic Meeting held in Addis Ababa (September 3rd and 4th, 2019) where he chaired the session. At the meeting, Dr. Agwogie was elected the Assistance Coordinator of ICUDDR in Africa. This was in recognition of his support for the development and professionalization of drug demand reduction in Africa.

At the ICUDDR Conference in Cusco, Peru

 

At the ICUDDR Africa Catalytic Meeting in Addis Ababa

 Awards

Within the period, GISA also recognised notable individuals with different categories of awards such as, award of Excellence for a Drug Free Society, award of Excellence in Drug Demand Reduction, GISA Drug Free Ambassadors, GISA Youth Drug Free Ambassadors (GYDFA), Friends of GISA among others.

GISA Youth Drug Free Ambassador, Mr. Emmanuel T. Daike being presented certificate of induction

 

Conclusion

The commencement of UPC training in Nigeria is not a mean feet. It is obvious that with the commencement of UPC, strategies for substance use prevention in Nigeria will no longer be the same. GISA expresses her appreciation to the facilitators for their commitment to the delivery of quality trainings, to our partners for believing in us and to our participants for encouraging us with words of commendation and commitment to doing good and no harm. To all our vendors and everyone, we say thank you.

The achievement recorded in the first year of this initiative is a positive sign of what to expect in the year 2020. We look forward to collaborations with government, non-government, private and relevant stakeholders in the field of drug demand reduction to deliver evidence-based substance use prevention capacity building in Nigeria. One sure way to address the multifaceted challenges of substance use is to develop comprehensive evidence-based substance use prevention across different settings such as family, community, workplace, school, primary health care centre, media among others.

 

We hope to expand our scope of trainings in 2020 to meet the yearnings for capacity building in evidence-based substance use prevention in Nigeria.

 

 

GLOBAL INITIATIVE ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE (GISA)

 

17, AYODELE FANOIKI STREET, MAGODO ESTATE PHASE I, ISHERI, LAGOS STATE

 

QUARTERLY REPORT
APRIL – JUNE, 2020

 

The second quarter of the year 2020 (April – June) was characterized by lockdown and restriction of movements due to COVID- 19 global pandemic. This made it difficult for Global Initiative on Substance Abuse (GISA) to organize any training or embark on any activities. It also became difficult to meet the increasing demand for capacity building on evidence-based substance abuse prevention for which GISA has become a reference point. In order to respond positively to the needs, challenges of COVID-19 and comply with its protocols, the second quarter was used to strategies for the third quarter. Measures were put in place to transit from in-person to virtual trainings. By the first week of June, arrangements were concluded, and the first virtual training was scheduled for July 20th to 25th, 2020. By the end of the second quarter, we had received over 20 applications for the virtual training.

 

While planning for the third quarter, GISA also made use of the period to reach out to participants in the previous UPC trainings to check on them and do some form of virtual recap using the WhatsApp platform and Zoom. This was to encourage them and refresh their memories on knowledge and skills acquired during the trainings. It was also an opportunity to test run the proposed commencement of virtual trainings. We look forward to the first virtual UPC training and the learning experience in the third quarter of the year as we work through the challenges of COVID-19 in the coming months.

 

GLOBAL INITIATIVE ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE (GISA)

 

17, AYODELE FANOIKI STREET, MAGODO ESTATE PHASE I, ISHERI, LAGOS STATE

 

QUARTERLY REPORT
JANUARY – MARCH, 2020

 

INTRODUCTION

The year 2020 started with great prospects for Global initiative on Substance Abuse (GISA) as arrangements for the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders Training of Practitioners were being made. Two training programmes were scheduled for the first quarter (January to March 2020). These were:

  1. Training of Practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders, January 27th – 1st of February 2020.
  2. Training of Practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders, March 9th – 14th, 2020

Training of Practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders, January 27th – February 1st, and March 9th – 14th, 2020

Total participants in the two trainings conducted in the first quarter of the year was 42. The trainings were conducted at GISA facility at No. 17 Ayodele Fanoiki Street, Magodo Estate Phase 1, Isheri, Lagos State. Each of the trainings started with an opening ceremony where the Founder/Executive Director GISA, Dr, Martin Agwogie charged participants to be committed to the training and learning. He encouraged them to participate in the various group exercises and share their experiences in line with adult learning principles. Participants were from both government, private and non-governmental organisations from different parts of the country.*******

 

 One of the Group Exercises   

Celebrating birthday with one of the participants

Presentation of certificate

 Presentation of certificate  

 

Post Training Evaluation, Pre and Post Test

In each of the trainings, there were pre-tests and post-tests. In addition, the training materials and programme contents were evaluated (Table I). Five of the trainers who facilitated in the two trainings were also independently assessed by the participants with respect to knowledge of the subject matter, delivery skills/supervision, time management, participant’s engagement, and general demeanor (Table 2).

Table 2

 

Knowledge, Skills and Experience of Participants after the Training

The feedback on the knowledge, skills and experience gathered from participants at the end of the training includes:

  • The significance of planning, monitoring of implementation and evaluation of interventions
  • How to identify needs and resources in a community
  • Professional code of ethics and the need for professionalism in the field of drug demand reduction
  • Better understanding of community variables in prevention
  • Better decision-making process in delivering evidence-based interventions
  • The credibility in fidelity with respect to the implementation of evidence-based programmes.
  • The importance of research in substance use prevention
  • The need for early intervention.
  • How to identify target population, community assessment and those who constitute “my dream team”.

 

Each of the trainings ended with words of encouragement from the Founder/Executive Director of GISA to the participants to go back to their various operational domains and put into practice the knowledge and skills gained from the trainings. Certificates of participation with credit hours were presented to the participants.

. 

Other activities of GISA in the first quarter of 2020

In recognition of the efforts of the Founder/Executive Director of GISA, Dr. Martin O. Agwogie through the activities of GISA, he was awarded a Distinguished Humphrey Leadership Fellow. In view of this Dr. Agwogie completed three weeks program in United States between January and February 2020. This includes an executive leadership course at Harvard Kennedy School of Government, professional affiliation and meetings with experts in the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), White House Office of the National Drug Control Policy, the State Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL), The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA) and the University of Maryland Center for Substance Abuse Research.

In a similar development, Dr. Agwogie attended the 63rd  session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) in Vienna, Austria 2nd  to 6th of March 2020. He participated in the training of selected NGO leaders across the globe on supporting civil society organizations to provide evidence-based interventions as one of the sidelines of CND.

 

Conclusion

The first quarter of the year ended with apprehension on the COVID-19 pandemic which has threatened public gatherings and trainings in the coming quarters. Despite that, GISA is desirous of providing evidence-based substance abuse prevention through any possible and impactful means.

 

 

GLOBAL INITIATIVE ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE (GISA)

 

17, AYODELE FANOIKI STREET, MAGODO ESTATE PHASE I, ISHERI, LAGOS STATE

 

QUARTERLY REPORT
OCTOBER – DECEMBER, 2019

 

INTRODUCTION

The last quarter of the year (October – December, 2019) consolidated the training activities of GISA from January to September, 2019 among other activities. The first part of the quarter was devoted to supporting the Founder/Executive Director, Dr. Martin Agwogie who is also the president of the International Society of Substance Use Prevention and Treatment Professionals (ISSUP Nigeria chapter) in the preparation for the formal inauguration of ISSUP Nigeria Chapter. The inauguration of the association and the first annual general meeting was held on the 17th of October 2019 at Chelsea Hotel Abuja, Nigeria.

Four training programmes were scheduled for the fourth quarter:

1. The School Based Track of the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders, October 21st – 26th, 2019.

2. Training on evidence based workplace substance abuse prevention and management for staff of Central Bank of Nigeria and Nigerian Port Authority, November 6th – 8th, 2019.

3. Echo training of practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders, November 25th – 30th, 2019.
4. Training on the concept of evidence based drug and substance abuse prevention for Lagos

state Ministry of Health and the Inter-Ministerial Drug Abuse Control Committee, December 4th – 5th, 2019.

School Based Track of the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders, October 21st – 26th, 2019

The first comprehensive School Based specialty track training of practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for substance use disorders in Nigeria was held between October 21st and 26th, 2019 with 11 participants drawn from various professional fields and among those who have received the UPC Core Course. The success of the first comprehensive school based specialty track oiled GISA strategies for subsequent activities for the first quarter of 2020.

Training on Evidence-based Workplace Substance Abuse Prevention and Management for CBN and NPA Staff, November 6th – 8th 2019

From 6th to 8th of November 2019, GISA in collaboration with 17 Goals Africa Initiative trained senior management staff of Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) and the Nigeria Port Authority (NPA) on evidence-based workplace substance abuse prevention, management and policy. The training was held at Sheraton hotel ikeja, Lagos state. At the opening ceremony, Dr. Martin Agwogie gave a rundown of expectations at the training, which includes the physiology and pharmacology of psychoactive substances; problems of substance use in the workplace; the relationship between individuals, families and workplace; risk and protective factors for substance use among employees; the business case for substance use prevention in the workplace; components of and development of substance use prevention policies in the workplace; implementation, monitoring and evaluation of evidence-based substance abuse prevention in the workplace; identification and management of employees with substance use disorders among other topics. He also highlighted the significance of the training. He noted that, “the challenges of substance abuse which has attained a frightening dimension in Nigeria must be addressed from all sides including the workplace and among the workforce considering the importance of this sector in the development of the national economy. While drugs and

substance abuse affects all age groups, the age group of 25 to 39 years is the most affected in Nigeria. Incidentally, this is one of the most important age bracket in the workforce. Despite this huge burden, there is no national policy on drug free workplace in Nigeria. Most organizations don’t have idea of what drug free workplace policy means and the justifications for it”.

Dr. Agwogie called on organizations, private and public, to emulate CBN and NPA towards addressing the burden of drug use and abuse among this critical population. Above all, “the federal government should engage experts in workplace substance abuse prevention and management to develop national policy on drug free workplace in Nigeria”..

Participants at the training for CBN and NPA staff, 6th to 8th Nov., 2019 at Sheraton Hotel, Ikeja, Lagos state

Group exercise at the training

One of the group presentations


Echo training of practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders, November 25th – 30th, 2019.

GISA continued the month of November with UPC training of practitioners held between 25th and 30th, 2019 with 23 participants. As usual, the training started with an opening ceremony where the Executive Director highlighted the journey so far and benefits of the training. Similarly the closing ceremony was observed with certificate presented to the participants.

Group presentations

Training on the Concept of Evidence-based Drug and Substance Abuse Prevention for Lagos State Ministry of Health, December 3rd and 4th, 2019

The last training of the year, 2019 was in collaboration with the Lagos State Ministry of Health and State Inter-Ministerial Drug Abuse Control Committee. Participants in the two days training on the concept of Evidence-based Drug and Substance Abuse Prevention were health professionals and teachers drawn from different parts of Lagos state. The training was held at the Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Institute (LCCI) Building, Ikeja, Lagos with a total of 50 participants. The training started with an opening ceremony which was graced by dignitaries including the Permanent Secretary of the Lagos state Ministry of health Dr. Olusegun Ogboye, the Director Pharmaceutical Services Lagos State Ministry of Health and Chairman Lagos State Inter-Ministerial Drug Abuse Control Committee, Pharm. (Dr.) Moyosore Adejumo, the Director, Pharmaceutical Inspectorate Unit Lagos State Ministry of Health, Pharm. Mosun Beckley among others.

During the opening ceremony the Permanent Secretary of the Lagos state Ministry of health Dr. Olusegun Ogboye, encouraged participants to take advantage of the training and reflect the knowledge gained during the training in their daily activities. He also appealed to them to cascade and share experience from the training in their various units. Pharm. (Dr.) Moyosore Adejumo, pointed out that the training was sponsored by the Lagos state government through the Ministry of Health with technical support of GISA. The Founder/Executive Director GISA, Dr. Martin Agwogie, noted that the trend in substance abuse among youths in Nigeria and Lagos State in particular need the urgent attention of everyone. According to him, “report from the 2018 national drug use survey shows that Lagos state has the highest number of persons who use psychoactive substances in Nigeria, this calls for urgent steps by everyone in Lagos State, this is not the time to sit on the fence. We must all rise to address this issue frontally to safeguard the future of the younger generation”. He also highlighted the focus and benefits of the training.

Pharm. Mosun Beckley, Dr. Martin O. Agwogie and Pharm. (Dr.) Moyosore Adejumo

Group picture of some participants at the training

Conclusion

GISA in the fourth quarter of the year extended its scope on evidence based capacity building to government ministries and departments. This is a positive sign of what to expect in the year 2020. We look forward to more collaboration with government, non-government, private and relevant stakeholders in the field of drug demand reduction to deliver evidence based substance abuse prevention capacity building in Nigeria. One sure way to address the multifaceted challenges of substance abuse is to develop comprehensive evidence based substance abuse prevention across different settings such as family, school, community, workplace, primary health care centre, media among others.

GISA seize this opportunity to express appreciation to the facilitators for their commitment to the delivery of quality trainings, to our partners for believing in us and to our participants for encouraging us with words of commendation and commitment to doing good and no harm in their service delivery. To all our vendors and everyone, we say thank you.

GLOBAL INITIATIVE ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE (GISA)

 

17, AYODELE FANOIKI STREET, MAGODO ESTATE PHASE I, ISHERI, LAGOS STATE

 

QUARTERLY REPORT
JULY – SEPTEMBER, 2019

 

INTRODUCTION

The third quarter of the year (July – September, 2019) started on a grand note as the annual conference of the International Society of Substance Use Prevention and Treatment Professionals (ISSUP) was held in Vienna with the Founder/Executive Director of GISA in the person of Dr. Martin O. Agwogie in attendance as the president of ISSUP Nigeria Chapter. At GISA, the following training programmes for the 3rdquarter were lined up:

1. National Training of Trainers on the UPC (Universal Prevention Curriculum) School- Based Track, 9th to 18th of July 2019.
2. Echo training of practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders, August 5th – 10th, 2019
3. Echo training of practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders, September 23rd – 28th, 2019

 National Training of Trainers on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) School-Based Track 9thto 18th of July, 2019

The National Training of Trainers on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) School-Based Track was held at the Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI), Ikeja, Lagos state. The training, which was the first of its kind in Nigeria, was put together by GISA in collaboration with the Colombo Plan Drug Advisory Programme with the support of Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL), United States. The 9 days training commenced with an opening ceremony witnessed by the Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry of Education who was represented by the Director, Basic and Secondary Education, Dr. Lami Amodu, the Public Affairs Officer, U.S. Consular General Lagos, Mr. Russell Brooks, the Director of Pharmaceutical Services Lagos State Ministry of Health and Chairman Lagos State Interministerial Drug Abuse Control Committee, Dr. Moyosore Adejumo, the Chairman Lagos State Teaching Service Board who was represented by the Director, Teachers Education and Capacity Development Mr. Kehinde S. Oladosu, representative of the Permanent Secretary, Lagos State Ministry of Education, Education District 1, among other dignitaries.

Mr. Kehinde S. Oladosu, Mr. Russell Brooks and Dr. Martin Agwogie

Dr. Martin Agwogie who is the National Coordinator Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) in Nigeria and the Founder/Executive Director of GISA, in his welcome address said “the 9-days training is coming after six months of the first UPC programme held in January this year. Since the first training of trainers, six batches of practitioners’ training have been conducted with a total of 153 practitioners imparted in evidence based substance abuse prevention in Nigeria. Our target is to train 2,000 practitioners in this area in the next one year”.

Some of the participants at the Training of Trainers

The Public Affairs Officer, U.S. Consular General, Lagos in the person of Russell Brooks who was the Special Guest of Honour at the event stated that “Societal, parental neglect and negative peer influence have been described as major factors that promote substance abuse among youths, hence all hands must be on deck
to curb the spread. According to Brooks, substance abuse is a global public health challenge and research shows that 14.3 million Nigerians between the ages of 15-64 years are victims of substance abuse, “If we are concerned about the growth of Africa, then we must promote policies and programs that will reduce substance abuse in Nigeria, which is the most populous black country in the continent”.

The training, according to the representative of Colombo Plan Drug Advisory Program and a trainer, Susan Mauwa, is in two series: The Coordinating series and the implementing series; Nigeria she revealed is said to be in the implementing series and this is the second round to be held.

The training was attended by 35 national trainers who travelled from different regions of Nigeria and they include individuals from different professional fields ranging from medicine, social sciences, teaching among others. The training covered the school based implementer series which is one of the seven tracks in the Universal Prevention Curriculum.

Echo Training of Practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders, August 5th – 10th, 2019

The 7thbatch of the echo training of practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) in Nigeria was held at GISA facility between 5th and 10th of August 2019. As usual the Founder/Executive Director at the opening ceremony took time to brief participants on the concept of UPC, the success story and the need to take the training seriously to enable them contribute more meaningfully to substance abuse prevention in Nigeria.

At the end of the six day training, participants were pleased to be part of the training and shared their experiences.

Echo Training of Practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders, September 23rd 27th, 2019

The 2ndand the last UPC echo training for the 3rdquarter was held between September 23rdand 27th2019 with 12 participants.

Facilitators in the two UPC echo trainings were Dr. Martin Agwogie, Mrs. Maria Ilugbuhi, Prof. Bola Ola, Dr. Oluseyi Odewale, Mr. Olatunde Isaac, Mr. Remilekun Taiwo, Mr. Olatunji Erinjogunola and Ms. Sandra Anyahaebi. Each of these facilitators was evaluated by the participants.

One of the participants at the training, Prof. Helen O. Osinowo

At the end of the trainings, participants received certificates with credit hours.

At the end of the third quarter, all the trainings laid up for the quarter was successfully executed, and participants of the training were enjoined to earnestly start the work of prevention at their various workplace using the newly acquired knowledge and skills in line with prevention principles and ethics to enhance their operational modalities for better outcomes

Evaluation and analysis of the training programs, materials and contents for the quarter was carried out accordingly
Table 1: Training programme content: Evaluation of Training Materials and Programme Contents.


Stat

Knowledge, Skills and Experience of Participants after the Training
The feedback on the knowledge, skills and experience gathered by participants at the end of the training includes: better informed about substance use and ways of prevention, learnt about increasing professional teamwork and analytical skills. Had better understanding of different target population in prevention interventions, implementation cycle in substance use prevention, abiding with professional ethics and standards as well as skills in sorting out associated issues. Also acquired knowledge on enforcement of policies for effective substance use prevention, behavioural patterns of individual and how to diffuse information on substance use to public without causing harm.

Things to Change Based on Training Experience
Trainees outlined things they would like to change based on the experience gathered during the training, and these are:

  • Changing the current perception about drug abuse.
  • Categorization of target audience.
  • Modify content delivered to early adolescents in sensitization.
  • Change strategies by targeting teachers and counsellors to implement substance prevention in schools
  • Changing how to address and discipline students using psychoactive substances.
  • Allocate more time for interaction and case study.
  • Generalisations and assumptions of the use of substance, and gut feelings.
  • Using the right terminologies in disseminating information on substance use.

Difficulties Likely to Face in Embarking on Change and Use of Experience
Participants outlined some difficulties that they might face in their workplace in applying the new knowledge and skills they have gained from the training and these include getting supervisors and colleagues to understand and use evidence based prevention approach in work modalities.

  • Sourcing funds for implementing prevention programs.
  • Work environment could pose a challenge to using EB prevention skills and knowledge gained.
  • Spiritual interpretation of substance by the public
  • Establishing collaboration with practitioners and professionals for program implementation.

Comments and Suggestion
Participants commented on the training and made suggestions, among the comments by some participants include:

– Thank you so much for this rare opportunity of learning from the experts, GISA staff, and fellow participants
– The content and delivery of the training was excellent.
– The program is intensive, immersive and amazing.

Participants appreciated the trainers for giving room for exclusive participation in the whole training process; they emphasize on the method of delivery which was immensely satisfactory and enjoyable; they wanted more and wouldn’t want the training to come to conclusion. Participants commended the organizers of the training and hoped that they would continue to educate all stakeholders in the society and in every parts of the country on substance use and prevention. Participants learnt a lot and looked forward to more trainings organized by GISA in collaboration with the Colombo Plan Drug Advisory Programme (DAP).

Other Activities
Beyond UPC trainings, GISA engaged in other activities within the third quarter. Early in the quarter, July 1st to 5th, 2019, the Founder/Executive Director, Dr. Martin Agwogie in his capacity as the president of ISSUP Nigeria Chapter, led a team of Nigerian representatives to the 5thGlobal ISSUP conference in Vienna, Austria where he also participated in the training of global trainers in Drug Demand Reduction. Also and as part of GISA advocacy mandate for the International Consortium of Universities for Drug Demand Reduction (ICUDDR), Dr. Martin Agwogie attended the 4th ICUDDR Conference in Cusco, Peru (July 22nd and 23rd, 2019). Similarly, Dr. Agwogie attended the ICUDDR Africa Catalytic Meeting held in Addis Ababa (September 3rd and 4th, 2019) where he chaired the session. At the meeting, Dr. Agwogie was made the Assistance Coordinator of ICUDDR in Africa. This was in recognition of his support for the development and professionalization of drug demand reduction in Africa.

ISSUP Conference in Vienna, Austria

At the ICUDDR Conference in Cusco, Peru

At the ICUDDR Africa Catalytic Meeting in Addis Ababa

Conclusion
The third quarter of the year ended on an affirmative note and with a lot of promises towards a more gratifying fourth quarter, one of which is the first echo training on the School-Based track of UPC scheduled for October, 2019. We hope to expand our scope of trainings in the fourth quarter of the year so as to meet the
yearnings for capacity building in evidence-based substance abuse prevention. GISA expresses appreciation to her team of facilitators, staff and participants of the UPC trainings, local and international partners for their contributions and support towards successful activities of another quarter.

GLOBAL INITIATIVE ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE (GISA)

 

17, AYODELE FANOIKI STREET, MAGODO ESTATE PHASE I, ISHERI, LAGOS STATE

 

QUARTERLY REPORT
APRIL – JUNE, 2019

 

INTRODUCTION

The second quarter of the year (April – June, 2019) started with great prospect as arrangements for the third and ensuing Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders training of practitioners were being made. Manuals, handbills, writing materials, folders, nametags of prospective participants were being prepared. Posters and fliers had been sent across platforms to inform the general public of the training and for interested persons to apply. The training programmes lined up for the quarter were:
1. Echo training of practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders, April 23rd – 27th
2. Echo training of Lagos State Secondary School Principals at the Lagos State Model College, Meiran, Agbado on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders,
3. Echo training of practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders, June 10th – 15th

Echo Training of Practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders, April 23rd – 27th

The third batch training on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for substance use disorders started on the 23rd of April, 2019 at GISA facility, no 17 Ayodele Fanoiki street, Magodo phase 1, Lagos. The training encompasses 21 participants from various professional fields such as medicine, psychology, guidance counselling pharmacy, education among others. They were from different organisations such the law enforcement (National Drug Law Enforcement Agency, NDLEA), hospitals, community pharmacy, government ministries of health and education, faith-based organizations, NGOs and the youth population.
The training was organized by GISA as an education service provider for Colombo Plan Drug Advisory Programme (DAP) and the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL), United States. The objective of the training was to provide participants with requisite Evidence-Based (EB) knowledge, skills and competencies on substance use prevention in order to help them provide evidence based interventions.

 

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Facilitators for the training were Dr. Martin Agwogie, Mrs. Maria Ilugbuhi, Professor Bola Ola, Dr. Oluseyi Odewale and Mr. Remilekun Taiwo. The training covered all the core implementer series in the Universal Prevention Curriculum.

The thriving execution of the third batch training on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for substance use disorders oiled our strategies and planning for subsequent activities delineated for the second quarter of the year.

Training of Secondary School Principals in Lagos State on Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC), 6th to 10th of May, 2019

By the 1st day of May 2019, preparation was already in great expectations for the UPC Echo training for practitioners slated for Lagos State Secondary School Principals. The training began on the 5th of May and lasted for six days. The opening ceremony which took place on the first day of the training was graced by dignitaries from the Lagos State Ministry of Education led by the Tutor General/Permanent Secretary Education District 1, Dr. Yinka Ayandele. The training was held at the Lagos State Model College, Meiran, Agbado, Lagos State. It was the first and all-inclusive evidence based substance abuse prevention training organized for secondary school principals in Lagos state, Nigeria. It was conducted at relatively no cost to the participants.

Dr. Yinka Ayandele
The Tutor General/Permanent Secretary Education District 1, Lagos State Ministry of Education

Mr. Ojedokun Y. Adeolu, Dr. Yinka Ayandele and Dr. Martin Agwogie

Dr. Martin O. Agwogie and Mr. Isaac Olatunde

The Founder/Executive Director of GISA and National Coordinator UPC, Dr. Martin Agwogie, led the team of UPC national trainers for the training. Other trainers were Professor Bola Ola, Dr. Oluseyi Odewale, Dr. Maymunah Kadiri, Mrs. Chinyere Okonkwo, Mrs. Felicia Ikechukwu, Mrs. Fibisola Taiwo, Mr. Isaac Olatunde, Mr. Remilekun Taiwo, Mr. Olatunji Erinjogunola, and Ms. Sandra Anyahaebi. The trainings covered the CORE of the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC), course.

Participants in training sessions

The training ended with participants better equipped for evidence based substance abuse prevention within and outside the school community. The month of May continued with preparations for an upcoming UPC training of practitioners scheduled for 10th – 15th of June at the GISA facility among other activities.

The month of June began with excitement as preparations for the UPC ECHO training was being finalised. Twenty-two participants were profiled for the training which took off on the 10th and ended on the 15th of June, 2019.

At the brief opening ceremony, the Founder/Executive Director of GISA, Dr. Martin Agwogie seized the opportunity to highlight the benefits received so far by participants in the UPC training since its commencement in January, notable among which was the selection of the 4 Drug Demand Reduction Global Trainers from Nigeria among the national trainers. The selected Global Trainers, he noted, will join other global experts in drug demand reduction in Vienna, Austria in the first week of July during the 5th Global ISSUP conference.

Each of the trainings in the second quarter ended with words of encouragement to the participants to go back to their various operational domains and undertake the problems of substance abuse making good use of the newly acquired knowledge and skills in line with prevention principles and ethics. Certificates of participation with credit hours were presented to the participants. There were pre-tests and post-tests. In addition, the training materials and programme contents were evaluated (see the respective tables). Five of the trainers who facilitated in the three trainings were also autonomously assessed by the participants with respect to knowledge of the subject matter, delivery skills/supervision, time management, participant’s engagement and general demeanor.

Trainers’ Evaluation

Result from figure 1 shows that all the facilitators had mean scores of between 89.32% and 95.91%. That means the facilitators are proficient in the UPC trainings.
Other evaluation and analysis of the training programs, materials and contents for the quarter can be seen in the table below:

Table 1: Training programme content: Evaluation of Training Materials and Programme Contents



KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE OF PARTICIPANTS AFTER THE TRAINING

The feedback on the knowledge, skills and experience gathered by participants at the end of the training includes:
 Better informed about substance use and prevention strategies
 Learnt better ways of tackling cases of substance use and abuse
 Steps involved in implementation cycle towards providing evidence based intervention for effective solution to substance abuse
 Gained knowledge to identify drug users and avoid or delay initiation of drug use
 Prevention of substance use is key
 Knowledge about different coping skills
 Better ways to identify the indicated and the selective population of substance use
 Informed about helping persons who use drugs out of their substance use without subjecting them to punishment.
 Learnt about building a team for effective implementation of prevention programs
 Learnt various forms of intervention on substance use prevention (EBI’s)
 Understood that prevention science is key to the reduction of substance use in the community
 Fidelity to program implementation is necessary for effective and positive outcome
 Gained confidence to talk about prevention of substance abuse using evidence based approach
 Learnt that persons who use drugs need to be related with love instead of being treated harshly

THINGS TO CHANGE BASED ON TRAINING EXPERIENCE
Trainees outlined things they would like to change based on the experience gathered during the training, and these were:
• Change in the current perception about drug abuse
• Change in the orientation and strategies on how to provide intervention to persons who use drugs
• Improve family parenting skills.
• Use persuasive speech to get the buy-ins of their bosses/supervisors about evidence-based substance use prevention.
• Gain the confidence of their colleagues into using evidence-based approach in tackling substance use issues
• Change the ways prevention activities have been conducted in the past including style or language of sensitization
• Change in attitudes towards users of substance.
• Change approach to community sensitization.
• Change language mode when talking to students on substance use and laying more emphasis on skills rather than mentioning names of substance.

DIFFICULTIES FACING CHANGE AND USE OF EXPERIENCE
Participants also outlined some difficulties that they might face applying the new knowledge and skills in their workplace. These include concept and perception of intervention implementation, limited resources such as funding for continuous training, cooperation of superiors/supervisors, the culture of target audience, difficulties in getting others who do not have the knowledge of evidence-based prevention intervention to come on board, challenges with some school policies, challenges with government policies, lack of willingness of colleagues to change and embrace new ideas, existing systems, bureaucracy and protocols for intervention, cultural barrier, and getting the approval of the community members.

COMMENTS AND SUGGESTION
Participants gave comments on the training and few suggestions, among the comments given by some participants include:
– Thank you so much for this rare opportunity of learning from the experts, GISA staff, and fellow participants. It was worth every penny and time!!! Wishing us all success in our various endeavors – Dr. Ujunwa Udunanya
– Yes! It was a well packaged program that was perfectly delivered. Kudos to GISA and the amiable CEO.-
Mrs. Elizabeth Omiwole
– Good morning all. Thanks to Dr. Martin Agwogie and his wonderful team. I appreciate you all. – Rev. Fr. Christopher Ogaga
– It was indeed a great experience. Thanks & more grace. – Rev. Fr. Bethrand Ujunwa
– So glad I came for this training, thank you – Mr. John Akinola
– Thank you for the fabulous training. – Mrs. Bolanle Balogun
– God bless GISA for this wonderful capacity building. – Mr. Baba Aliyu
– God bless GISA, the sky is your beginning Dr. Martin Agwogie. Thank you for the opportunity. – Mr. Iortyer Adabo
– Thank you for giving us this opportunity sir. – Dr. Mary Ogedengbe

In addition, participants concurred that the facilitators gave room for trainee’s participation; the method of delivery was adequate; trainers were very competent; training was well organized; facilitators were able to differentiate treatment from prevention, the training venue and curriculum were excellent and relevant, strict and effective time management, their learning about child development and the ability to change the way they approach issues. Having said these, they wanted more time for the presentations so that new participants, those who are new in the field of substance abuse, can assimilate better; and more time allocated for participants- facilitators interactions for more practical learning experiences.
The combination of facilitators was very good as they complemented each other and raised the standard. They commended the organizers of the training and hoped that they would continue to educate all stakeholders in

the society and in other parts of Nigeria on substance use and prevention. Overall, they learnt a lot and looked forward to more trainings organized by GISA in collaboration with the Colombo Plan Drug Advisory Programme (DAP).

LESSONS LEARNT
Every training provides opportunity to learn from participants and improve on previous lessons. The broad expertise of participants from different professional backgrounds in addition to the method of delivery of the modules fetched new lessons. The group work brought about creativity and different perspective that may not have been envisaged. Similarly, new dimension of team work in substance use prevention was introduced. For example module 8 which is on “The Implementation Cycle: Skills, Competences for Prevention Professionals” brought to bear the level of knowledge and skills acquired by the participants within the first few days of the training. They were able to appreciate the need for collectiveness in addressing the issues of substance abuse in the community. The exercises demonstrated the importance of needs and resource assessment in substance use prevention. More often emphasis is on the needs with little or no attention to resources within the community. The exercises also conveyed the uniqueness of each community, maximum utilisation of limited resources, and ability to identify the target population for intervention. Each community for each of the trainings have sufficiently demonstrated consistencies in identifying the needs and resources within their communities as well as plan interventions. Similarly, participants in every of the trainings have come up with different strategies to communicate experiences from the training to their colleagues and supervisors based on the peculiarity of their work environment. These have become great lessons. The developers of this Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for substance use disorders must be commended for the well researched and developed curriculum for substance use prevention. The curriculum has proven its uniqueness in capacity building for evidence based substance use prevention. There are observations from the participants, which we believe, will add value to the curriculum. These will be communicated through the appropriate channel for consideration in the subsequent review.

OTHER ACTIVITIES
Beyond UPC trainings, GISA engaged in other activities within the second quarter. Also, we provided consultancy services in the area of substance use prevention, treatment and policies. The Founder/Executive Director, Dr. Martin Agwogie granted press interviews within the period. Some of the interviews were aired on the National Television Authority (NTA), Lagos Television (LTV) among others. The print media were not left out as interviews were published in Guardian Newspaper, The New Telegraph, Thisday Newspaper among others. He was also invited as a Keynote speaker at the Symposium on Drug and Substance Abuse in Nigeria organized by the Nigeria Academy of Pharmacy in Collaboration with The Pharmaceutical Society of Nigeria held in Lagos June 2019. Within the period, GISA also recognised notable individuals with different categories of awards such as, GISA Drug Free Ambassadors.

Receiving Appreciation Award from the Chairman NAP, Prince Julius Adelusi-Adeluyi (OFR)


GISA Youth Drug Free Ambassador, Mr. Emmanuel T. Daike being presented certificate of induction

CONCLUSION
The second quarter of the year ended on an affirmative note and with a lot of promises towards a more gratifying third quarter, one of which is the National Training of Trainers on the School-Based track of UPC scheduled for July 2019. We hope to expand our scope of trainings in the third quarter of the year so as to meet the yearnings for capacity building in evidence-based substance abuse prevention. GISA expresses appreciation to her team of facilitators, staff and participants of the UPC trainings, local and international partners for their contributions and support towards successful activities of another quarter.

 

 

 GLOBAL INITIATIVE ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE (GISA)

17, AYODELE FANOIKI STREET, MAGODO ESTATE PHASE I, ISHERI, LAGOS STATE

 

 

QUARTERLY REPORT
JANUARY – MARCH, 2019

 

INTRODUCTION

The year 2019 started on a high note and with great expectations as preparations for the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for Substance Use Disorders trainings for the first quarter of the year (January – March, 2019) were being made. The training programmes lined up for this quarter were:

1. The National Training of Trainers on Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for                  Substance Use Disorders, January 15 – 24, 2019
2.  Echo Training of Practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for             Substance Use Disorders, March 11- 16, 2019 (Batch 1) and March 25 – 30, 2019 (Batch 2)

National Training of Trainers on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC), Jan. 15 – 24, 2019

The first national training of trainers on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for substance use disorders in Nigeria was held at the Lagos Airport Hotel Ikeja, Lagos state. This training, which lasted for nine days, started with an opening ceremony which was graced by the following dignitaries: Chairman/Chief Executive of the National Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA) who was represented by the Director Training and Manpower Development, Dr. Lawrence Opara; Director General of the National Agency for Food and Drugs Administration and Control (NAFDAC) who was represented by the Head, Drug Demand Reduction, Pharm. Clara Anyanwu; National Project Officer, Drug Demand Reduction of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Dr. Akanidomo Ibanga; Baale of Isheri Oke Town, Chief Bankole; Proprietor/CEO, Unique Group of Schools, Mrs. Esther Ayere-Alatise; Director, Social Welfare Department of Lagos State Ministry of Youths and Social Development, Mr. Olabode Taliat Ajao; Chairman, Board of Trustees of GISA, Mr. Ebenezer O. Olaseinde; and Chairman, Advisory Board of GISA, Sir. Victor C. Eka, among other personages.

Participants at the training were professors and doctors of medicine, psychology, and guidance counselling; pharmacists, clergy men, and principals of secondary schools. In attendance were also experts in Drug Demand Reduction from the Drug Law Enforcement and Regulatory Agencies that included NDLEA and NAFDAC, representatives of State Drug Control Committees and Ministries of Education and Youth Development. The faith-based organizations and the youths were not left out. Equally represented were specialists in drug demand reduction from Non-Governmental and Civil Society Organizations.

The landmark comprehensive evidence-based training of prevention of substance use in Nigeria was organized by GISA in collaboration with The Colombo Plan, Drug Advisory Programme (DAP) and the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL), United States.

The objective of the training was to provide participants with requisite Evidence-Based (EB) knowledge, skills and competencies on substance use prevention in order to help them train other practitioners across Nigeria.

Facilitators for the training were George Murimi, Susan Maua and Maria M. Ilugbuhi. They were all trainers from The Colombo Plan, Drug Advisory Programme (DAP). The training covered all the core implementer series and the first three school-based implementer series. The school-based implementer series is one of the seven tracks in the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) for implementers.

The successful execution of its first National training on Prevention of Substance Use Disorders in Nigeria was a huge achievement in the month of January, 2019 for GISA.
The month of February started with preparations for the Universal Prevention Curriculum Echo Trainings for Practitioners scheduled for March, 2019. While these plans were going on, GISA was able to conduct a capacity building programme, where youths were assisted to develop effective measures towards sustainable substance abuse prevention. This programme was anchored by GISA Youth Drug Free Ambassadors (GYDFA), a platform where youths from different parts of the country have opportunities and rights to talk, relate and share ideas on how to improve their immediate community and environment and steer them away from drug abuse and its consequences. Furthermore, GISA team led by the Founder/Executive Director, Dr. Martin O. Agwogie, honoured a conference invitation by MTN Foundation, the host. Dr. Agwogie was a guest speaker in this conference where the sole focus was on Anti Substance Abuse Project (ASAP). The event was held in the month of February at the Civic Center, Victoria Island, Lagos.

 

Training of Practitioners on the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC) March 11 – 15 and 20 – 25, 2019
Having concluded preparations for the Echo Trainings in February, GISA conducted UPC trainings for substance use practitioners in two batches. The training workshop for the first group took place from March 11th through 16th in 2019 while the second batch held between the 25th and 30th of March, 2019. Both batches were trained at GISA facility at Plot 17, Ayodele Fanoiki Street, Magodo Estate Phase I, Isheri, Ikeja, Lagos state. There were 22 and 18 participants in the first and second groups respectively.
The trainings were organized by GISA in collaboration with the Colombo Plan Drug Advisory Programme (DAP). In these workshops, the Founder and Executive Director of GISA, Dr. Martin Agwogie, led the team of UPC Master and National trainers that comprised of Mrs. Maria Ilugbuhi, Professor Bola Ola, Dr. Oluseyi Odewale, Dr. Grace Ijarogbe, Mrs. Chinyere Okonkwo and Mr. Remilekun Taiwo. Each of the trainings covered the CORE of the Universal Prevention Curriculum (UPC), course. As much as the trainings were very educative, they were also fun-filled as the facilitators made every presentation including group works/exercises lively and interactive for participants.

Each of the two trainings ended with words of encouragement to the participants to go back to their various operational domains and tackle the problems of substance abuse making good use of the newly acquired knowledge and skills in line with prevention principles and ethics. Certificates of participation with credit hours were presented to the participants.
In each of the trainings, there were pre-tests and post-tests. In addition, the training materials and programme contents were evaluated (see Table I below). Five of the trainers who facilitated in the two trainings were also independently assessed by the participants with respect to knowledge of the subject matter, delivery skills/supervision, time management, participant’s engagement and general demeanor (see Figure 1 below).

A. Evaluation of trainers

Figure 1: Facilitators’ Proficiency level

SCALE: Developing = 0 – 25%; Adequate= 25 – 50%; Approaching Proficiency= 50 – 75%; Proficient= 75 – 100%.

Result from figure 1 shows that all the facilitators had mean scores of between 75.47 and 93.75. That means the facilitators are proficient in the UPC trainings.

Table 1: Training programme content

Other variables measured during the training will be collated with subsequent trainings and published accordingly.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE OF PARTICIPANTS AFTER THE TRAINING

The feedback on the knowledge, skills and experience gathered by participants at the end of the training includes:

  •  The importance of Evidence Based Intervention (EBI) for substance use disorders and not gut-feelings;
  • ‘Prevention skills’ is the missing link in drug demand reduction;
  •  The significance of monitoring and evaluation of interventions;
  • Importance of planning, implementation and evaluation;
  • School-based interventions;
  • How to identify needs and resources;
    The need for resource assessment to kick start a prevention process;
  • Professional code of ethics and the need for professionalism in the field;
  • Better understanding and coming to terms with happenings around community;
  • Better decision-making process, theory-informed implementation cycle, developmental stages of children and how to introduce substance use prevention in school settings;
  • How to fit an evidence-based intervention into an existing programme;
  •  The credibility in fidelity with respect to the implementation of evidence-based programmes;
  • The need for data gathering/research before interventions are provided;
  • Parenting and teaching of pro-social skills in place of just “say no approach;
  • Theories to use for different cases;
  • Knowledge about different coping skills;
    How to identify areas of strength and sustainability;
  • Methods of prevention intervention;
    Skills to be developed when engaging in evidence-based prevention;
  • The need for early intervention;
  • Not focusing on the negative aspect of substance use but on improving decision making and life-skills;
  • How to identify target population, community assessment and those who constitute “my dream team”.
    THINGS TO CHANGE BASED ON TRAINING EXPERIENCE
    Trainees listed out 12 things they would like to change based on the experience gathered during the training, and these were: (1) changing the current perception about drug abuse, (2) changing the orientation on how to provide intervention, (3) changing the perception about persons who use drugs, (4) improving the level of knowledge about family skills, (5) using persuasive speech to get the buy-ins of their bosses/supervisors about evidence-based prevention, (6) changing the ways prevention activities have been conducted in the past including style or language of sensitization, (7) using age appropriate language and methods to teach necessary skills and not just saying “no to drugs” or using scare tactics, (8) following the implementation through the cycle, not doing harm but good, (9) making sure there are components of monitoring and evaluation, (10) adhering strongly to fidelity and ethical standards, (11) improving interpersonal skills among youths, (11) changing the mind-set on getting substance users arrested and providing help/referral for treatment and counselling services instead, and (12) avoiding the use of persons in recovery from substance use during prevention intervention programmes.

DIFFICULTIES FACING CHANGE AND USE OF EXPERIENCE

The participants enumerated some difficulties that they might likely face in trying to implement the change based on the experience gathered during the training. These included availability of resources, cooperation from superior/supervisors, culture of target audience, getting others who do not have the knowledge of evidence-based prevention intervention to come on board, challenges with some school policies, concept and perception of intervention implementation, limited resources for continuous training, lack of willingness of colleagues to change and embraces new ideas, existing systems, bureaucracy and protocols for intervention, financial resources for the interventions, and getting the approval of the community members.

OVERALL TRAINING EXPERIENCE
Overall review of participants’ experiences shows that most of the participants indicated that:
 The training was interactive, enlightening, exciting, impactful, great, wonderful, fun, impressive and worth the while;
 Participants were able to have better understanding of new useful concepts;
 Participants had new knowledge on Evidence Based Interventions (EBI) and how to implement them after training was acquired;
 The knowledge on substance prevention was worth the time;
 Exposure to prevention and implementation of substance use prevention programmes was educating and refreshing.

COMMENTS AND SUGGESTION

Participants were of the opinion that facilitators gave room for trainee’s participation; the method of delivery was adequate; trainers were very competent; training was well organized; facilitators were able to differentiate treatment from prevention, the training venue and curriculum were excellent and relevant, strict and effective time management, their learning about child development and the ability to change the way they approach issues. Having said these, they wanted more time for the presentations so that new participants, those who are new in the field of substance abuse, can assimilate better; and more time allocated for participants-facilitators interactions for more practical learning experiences.
In addition, the combination of facilitators was very good as they complemented each other and raised the standard. They commended the organizers of the training and hoped that they would continue to educate all stakeholders in the society and in other parts of Nigeria on substance use and prevention. Overall, they learnt a lot and looked forward to more trainings organized by GISA collaboration with the Colombo Plan Drug Advisory Programme (DAP).

OTHER ACTIVITIES
Beyond trainings, GISA engaged in other activities within the first quarter. Three (3) clients were admitted for treatment interventions for substance use disorders. Also, we provided consultancy services in the area of substance use prevention, treatment and policies. The Founder/Executive Director granted press interviews within the period. Some of the interviews were aired on the National Television Authority (NTA), Lagos Television (LTV) among others. The print media were not left out as interviews were published in Guardian Newspaper, The New Telegraph, Thisday, and Daily Times among others.
Within the period, GISA also recognised notable individuals with different categories of awards such as, GISA Drug Free Ambassadors, award of Excellence for a Drug Free Society and Mother of Excellence for a Drug Free Society through Education.

CONCLUSION
The first quarter of the year ended on a positive note and with a lot of promises. There were inquiries from many participants and interest in further UPC trainings. It is reassuring to know that professionals in the field of drug demand reduction in Nigeria have waited long for the opportunity to receive comprehensive training on evidence-based interventions for substance use disorders. We hope to expand our scope of training in the second quarter of the year so as to meet the demand for capacity building in evidence-based substance abuse prevention.

 

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GISA Initiative

We provide solutions to substance abuse through life skills training to prevent the initiation of substance use, help users to abstain and or live a quality life.

© 2020 Gisa Initiative.

Contact

Office Address

No.17, Ayodele Fanoiki street, Adjacent Magodo Police Post, Magodo Estate Phase 1,Isheri, Lagos State, Nigeria.

Phone Numbers

+2347053486054
+2347039042687

Email

info@gisainitiative.org